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Jet Rose

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I want to ask you that "Jet Rose" in English what is it mean? And how is it called in Spanish'

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updated OCT 4, 2008
posted by Huyen-Thanh

26 Answers

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Huyen Thanh said:

Uhm! I dont know but someone thought that "Jet Rose" it's so meaningless. Can you expain to me more?


Huyen, I think the confusion is because "rose" can mean a color (dark pink) or a flower. Some of those who read your post thought you meant one, and some thought the other. "Jet" as a word for a color is not really used very often in day-to-day conversation, although you are absolutely correct that it is a way to say "very black". I guess we haven't really heard it used to describe a rose! smile Probably "black rose" is way to go.

updated OCT 4, 2008
posted by Valerie
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Huyen Thanh said:

Thanks James! I thought that u understood my thinking. Really, I want to say that like you said.

And I want to know how do I spell by Spanish. But now I see it. That is rosa negríma. And negro abazache is jet black. And maybe, in English, I can say Jet black Rose instead of Jet Rose, cann't I? And don't say Jet Rose?

Tell me please?

Thanks much James, thanks much!

James Santiago said:

Quentin said:

I've never heard the term "jet" used with any other color,

As samdie has said, it is only used with black because jet is, well, black. It's like saying daffodil yellow or snow white.

It seems to me that Huyen is trying to say black rose, or rosa negra. She says "It is like black colour but jet is more beautiful than black colour," but I disagree with that because jet black is by definition pure black (in optics terms, the absence of all color). She could say "rosa negrísma" to stress the blackness of the rose. Jet black in Spanish is negro azabache, with azabache being jet itself.

You could say "a jet-black rose," but I've never actually seen a rose that black. The real "black" roses are more of a deep purple . . .

updated OCT 4, 2008
posted by Natasha
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what is internetin?
Spin; is my editor day off.
fact: It was a dum mistake-that's all.

Gus said:

From the beginning of time, the black rose has been a potent symbol in cultures all over the world. This mystical flower can celebrate a light-hearted milestone birthday, render the heartfelt loss of love, or make a strong case for vengeance and retaliation.I copied this from the internetin the internet.

>

updated OCT 4, 2008
posted by 00769608
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From the beginning of time, the black rose has been a potent symbol in cultures all over the world. This mystical flower can celebrate a light-hearted milestone birthday, render the heartfelt loss of love, or make a strong case for vengeance and retaliation.

I copied this from the internetin the internet.

updated OCT 4, 2008
posted by 00769608
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Thanks James!
I thought that u understood my thinking. Really, I want to say that like you said.
And I want to know how do I spell by Spanish. But now I see it. That is rosa negríma. And negro abazache is jet black. And maybe, in English, I can say Jet black Rose instead of Jet Rose, cann't I? And don't say Jet Rose?
Tell me please?
Thanks much James, thanks much!

James Santiago said:

Quentin said:

I've never heard the term "jet" used with any other color,

As samdie has said, it is only used with black because jet is, well, black. It's like saying daffodil yellow or snow white.

It seems to me that Huyen is trying to say black rose, or rosa negra. She says "It is like black colour but jet is more beautiful than black colour," but I disagree with that because jet black is by definition pure black (in optics terms, the absence of all color). She could say "rosa negrísma" to stress the blackness of the rose. Jet black in Spanish is negro azabache, with azabache being jet itself.

>

updated OCT 4, 2008
posted by Huyen-Thanh
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Huyen Thanh said:

Thanks Natasha! I think that I have to learn words in context more, perhap have to pulling them out of the dictionary. And now, if I want to descripbe the colour of the coal, it's glistening and sparkling'How do I do? Can you help me, please?


The "glistening and sparkling" idea would usually be given in English by saying "shiny black" ("shiny" can be used with just about any color). For Spanish, you can find several choices by looking up "shiny" in this site's dictionary.

updated OCT 3, 2008
posted by samdie
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Huyen Thanh said:

Thanks Natasha! I think that I have to learn words in context more, perhap have to pulling them out of the dictionary. And now, if I want to descripbe the colour of the coal, it's glistening and sparkling'How do I do? Can you help me, please?

You could certainly say that hard coal is jet black. In fact, coal is so well known that we have another expression, "black as coals."

updated OCT 3, 2008
posted by Natasha
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Thanks Natasha! I think that I have to learn words in context more, perhap have to pulling them out of the dictionary. And now, if I want to descripbe the colour of the coal, it's glistening and sparkling'How do I do? Can you help me, please'

updated OCT 3, 2008
posted by Huyen-Thanh
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http://www.buy.com/prod/black-jet-crystal-rose-pendant-w-chain-neck...
[url=http://www.tablewhere.co.uk/Patterns.aspx'mfrcode=RSN&PtnCode=RSN0746]http://www.tablewhere.co.uk/Patterns.aspx'mfrcode=RSN&PtnCode=R...[/url]
[url=http://www.asos.com/Asos/Asos-Large-Jet-Rose-Ring-With-Metallic-Edge/Prod/pgeproduct.aspx'iid=388290&cid=4175&clr=Silver&sh=0]http://www.asos.com/Asos/Asos-Large-Jet-Rose-Ring-With-Metallic-Edg...[/url]

I think we agreed that jet rose meant black (jet) rose. If you look at the jewelry or dish patterns links above which are called jet rose you will see that they are rose shaped and black. I also saw a piece of jewelrly that was a combination of rose colored and jet colored stones called jet rose. So jet rose is black&dark pink or black, rose shaped.

http://designsbymemory.com/shopsite_sc/store/html/product71.html

Huyen Thanh said:

Good afternoon Samdie! Really you are right. I was meaning "Jet" (adj.) that Jet is very dark black, but it's beautiful, and if I want to descripbe the coal, it has jet colour, this is mean that the coal is black and it's glistening. And I was meaning same to Jet Rose.Uhm! I dont know but someone thought that "Jet Rose" it's so meaningless. Can you expain to me more?

>

updated OCT 3, 2008
posted by 0074b507
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Good afternoon Elsa! Ya, I was meaning that the Rose has very beautiful dark, it's very dark but beautiful and it's sparkling and glistening. But I dont know, "Jet Rose" word is right or not? I want to discuss about that.
Thanks for ur discussion to me.
Nice to meet you!

updated OCT 3, 2008
posted by Huyen-Thanh
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Good afternoon Samdie! Really you are right. I was meaning "Jet" (adj.) that Jet is very dark black, but it's beautiful, and if I want to descripbe the coal, it has jet colour, this is mean that the coal is black and it's glistening. And I was meaning same to Jet Rose.
Uhm! I dont know but someone thought that "Jet Rose" it's so meaningless. Can you expain to me more'

updated OCT 3, 2008
posted by Huyen-Thanh
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Marco said:

Yes, you are right. What I knew before was "María era la mas guapa" this form.

What I was asking you was how to extend the adjective words to become the form like "guapísima" and if there is a rule about how to extend the words? Would you have any ideas?
I'm not sure of what you're asking. Do you mean, given the standard form of an adjective, how does one form the superlative form? or do you mean under what circumstances (in what sorts of expressions) does one use the superlative form'

updated OCT 2, 2008
posted by samdie
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samdie said:

Marco said:

Thank you, Samdie for your reply. Now I know that it's the superlative form, but how can I use the superlative form? I mean how to combine the words? Is there a rule of using superlative form?

I don't know about a rule but ...As far as I know the superlative is mostly used in an intensive sense in Spanish. Thus, "eres guapísima" = "ÿou are very/really/super beautiful" but it is certainly possible to say (in Spanish) something like "entre las muchachas que asistían María era la guapísima." = "Among the women that were there, Maria was the most beautiful." ("María era la más guapa" would also be v a very common way of saying the same thing.) From the point fo view of grammar/syntax the thing to watch out for is the use of el/la before the superlative; basically that's a signal of the traditional superlative rather than than the intensice.

Yes, you are right. What I knew before was "María era la mas guapa" this form.
What I was asking you was how to extend the adjective words to become the form like "guapísima" and if there is a rule about how to extend the words.
Would you have any ideas?

Thank you,

Marco

updated OCT 2, 2008
posted by Marco-T
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Marco said:

Thank you, Samdie for your reply. Now I know that it's the superlative form, but how can I use the superlative form? I mean how to combine the words? Is there a rule of using superlative form?


I don't know about a rule but ...
As far as I know the superlative is mostly used in an intensive sense in Spanish. Thus, "eres guapísima" = "ÿou are very/really/super beautiful" but it is certainly possible to say (in Spanish) something like "entre las muchachas que asistían María era la guapísima." = "Among the women that were there, Maria was the most beautiful." ("María era la más guapa" would also be v a very common way of saying the same thing.) From the point fo view of grammar/syntax the thing to watch out for is the use of el/la before the superlative; basically that's a signal of the traditional superlative rather than than the intensice.

updated OCT 2, 2008
posted by samdie
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samdie said:

Marco said:

Another question for James, where did "negrísma" come from? I couldn't find this word. Would you please give me the explaination?

I'm not James but "negrísma/o" is the superlative form of "negra/o", hence = "vary black" or "the blackest"

Thank you, Samdie for your reply. Now I know that it's the superlative form, but how can I use the superlative form? I mean how to combine the words? Is there a rule of using superlative form?

Thank you,

Marco

updated OCT 2, 2008
posted by Marco-T
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