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Liberados - Liberar

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I was reading a news story and the headline says:

100 cocodrilos son liberados en el río Viejo.

It's clear enough that 100 crocodiles were freed in to the Viejo River. My question is about the verb liberar used here. I can't find "liberados" in any of the conjugation charts. Shouldn't it read: 100 cocodrilos son liberábamos en el río Viejo'"

4742 views
updated SEP 7, 2008
posted by Difster

18 Answers

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lazarus1907 said:

"Fue muerto" is a construction which has been kept alive for centuries even though nowadays you don't say "morir a alguien". It is more frequently used than the more logical "fue matado", which is correct of course.


He he, I hadn't noticed that before, 'fue muerto' I suppose in this context would be something like (in this context) 'he was deaded'

updated SEP 7, 2008
posted by tad
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"Fue muerto" is a construction which has been kept alive for centuries even though nowadays you don't say "morir a alguien". It is more frequently used than the more logical "fue matado", which is also correct, of course.

Again, the idea is that "ser + past participle" is used for actions, and "estar + past participle" is used for results. "Estuvo muerto" would be like "He was/remained dead".

updated SEP 7, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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Don't feel bad, I'm the king of digression. Carry on! As long as someone is learning something, I'm ok with it.

tad said:

tad said:

Mark Baker said:

Can you give me anymore examples'I'm trying to relate your examples to 'Ser' being a perminent state (DOCTOR) whereas 'Estar' is a temporary state (PLACE)

I'm feeling guillty now that I've taken difster's thread off on a tangent. Re ser and estar I think it is better to think in terms of estar -the state of something ser -the essence of something rather than that temporary/permanence thing.

Here's a good one from the book I mentioned

Fue muerto a tiros, y ahora esta' muerto -the author did admit the second part to be slightly redundant grin

>

updated SEP 7, 2008
posted by Difster
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tad said:

Mark Baker said:

Can you give me anymore examples'I'm trying to relate your examples to 'Ser' being a perminent state (DOCTOR) whereas 'Estar' is a temporary state (PLACE)

I'm feeling guillty now that I've taken difster's thread off on a tangent. Re ser and estar I think it is better to think in terms of estar -the state of something ser -the essence of something rather than that temporary/permanence thing.

Here's a good one from the book I mentioned

Fue muerto a tiros, y ahora esta' muerto -the author did admit the second part to be slightly redundant grin

updated SEP 7, 2008
posted by tad
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100 cocodrilos fueron liberados en el rio viejo.

updated SEP 7, 2008
posted by pisacaballo
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:

I'm trying to relate your examples to 'Ser' being a perminent state (DOCTOR) whereas 'Estar' is a temporary state (PLACE)

Don't try to do that, because the permanent / temporary rule is very unreliable (I don't recommend using it).

updated SEP 7, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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Mark Baker said:

Can you give me anymore examples'I'm trying to relate your examples to 'Ser' being a perminent state (DOCTOR) whereas 'Estar' is a temporary state (PLACE)

I'm feeling guillty now that I've taken difster's thread off on a tangent. Re ser and estar I think it is better to think in terms of estar -the state of something ser -the essence of something rather than that temporary/permanence thing.

updated SEP 7, 2008
posted by tad
0
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Can you give me anymore examples?

I'm trying to relate your examples to 'Ser' being a perminent state (DOCTOR) whereas 'Estar' is a temporary state (PLACE)

updated SEP 7, 2008
posted by Mark-Baker
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lazarus1907 said:

tad said:

I have a question here about using estar with participles, I dimly remember that using here 'esta'n liberados' would indicate that they were freed (that is the state that they were in without any further explanation) whereas 'son liberados' would indicate that they were freed due to an action (probably human intervention)?

Ser + past participle : actionEstar + past participle : result of an action

That's what I had in mind and I was thinking of a section from JJ Keenan's book which I have had a look at. Some examples he gives:

Fue cambiado =It was changed (by someone)
Estaba cambiado =It was (looked) changed.

Fue dormido =It was put to sleep.
Estaba dormido =It was asleep.

Fue roto =It was broken (by someone)
Estaba roto =It was (already) broken

updated SEP 7, 2008
posted by tad
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Heidita said:

Tad, very simply explained:estar+participio = fact, ya se ha hechoser+participio= passiveLa casa es construida (is (being) built)La casa está construida (is already built/has been built)

I think what I was thinking of is not like this. Something to do with past participles related to ser and estar in the past.
Therefore with the example it would be 100 cocodriles estaban librados v. 100 cocodriles fueron librados but I don't want to confuse things here, I'll start a thread if I can frame the question better.

updated SEP 7, 2008
posted by tad
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tad said:

I have a question here about using estar with participles, I dimly remember that using here 'esta'n liberados' would indicate that they were freed (that is the state that they were in without any further explanation) whereas 'son liberados' would indicate that they were freed due to an action (probably human intervention)?

Ser + past participle : action
Estar + past participle : result of an action

updated SEP 7, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

Tad, very simply explained:

estar+participio = fact, ya se ha hecho

ser+participio= passive

La casa es construida (is (being) built)
La casa está construida (is already built/has been built)

updated SEP 7, 2008
posted by 00494d19
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Heidita said:

Difster, i wonder why you couldn't find the word liberado ... participio pasado: liberado

(from the conjugation chart)

In this case, the passive is used, which in Spanish (like in English) is formed by:

ser+participio

son liberados = are freed


If it's a straightforward passive, oughtn't it be "fueron liberados"? (Unless it were a regular occurrence [e.g. "On the 1st of every month..." or "Every year, at this time ..."]).

Or, is that just a case of "headline-speak"'

updated SEP 7, 2008
posted by samdie
0
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I read from this that 100 crocodiles are free in the river and liberados is an adjective. If it had been 'totugas' it would have been son liberadas.

I have a question here about using estar with participles, I dimly remember that using here 'esta'n liberados' would indicate that they were freed (that is the state that they were in without any further explanation) whereas 'son liberados' would indicate that they were freed due to an action (probably human intervention)'

updated SEP 7, 2008
posted by tad
0
votes

Difster, i wonder why you couldn't find the word liberado ...

participio pasado: liberado

(from the conjugation chart)

In this case, the passive is used, which in Spanish (like in English) is formed by:

ser+participio

son liberados = are freed

updated SEP 7, 2008
posted by 00494d19
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