Si la vaca remosca, la cria no mama.

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I can't find the word remosca in a dictionary.

If the cow remosca, the mother doesn't raise it.

''''

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updated JUN 7, 2008
posted by motley

23 Answers

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Motley
I must admit, you do come up with some corkers.

updated JUN 7, 2008
posted by Eddy
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Gracias a todos.

I guess something like ants in the pants Or a rolling stone gathers no moss. I'm trying to remember what was happening at the time in the novela.

Looks like I'm not the only one that learned something.
I am finding that I have to look up a lot of English words when trying to translate Spanish, some I have never heard before, others, just not that familiar with.

Wonder what I'll come up with on tonights episode'

updated JUN 6, 2008
posted by motley
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Hi Motley, as you told me it was from a mexican telenovela, here you are, this is a friend of mine:

updated JUN 6, 2008
posted by 00494d19
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And mom is used for the Queen, which really sounds funny to us Yanks.

updated JUN 6, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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That's one word we don't agree on Natasha. Over here as Lazarus has said, mummy is your mother.

updated JUN 6, 2008
posted by Eddy
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I found another Cantábrian saying that uses this word:

Corderos que remoscan de mañana, pronto se mojan la lana.

Lazarus tells us that remoscarse may mean "Get to the shadow to avoid [being] bothered by flies." (BTW, "shadow" should be "shade" here; shade is used in the context of escaping the heat of the sun, whereas shadow refers more to sunlight being blocked by something.) If that is true, then what do these two sayings really mean? Not the literal meaning, but the message they are trying to convey.

Lambs that seek refuge in the morning shade, soon get their wool wet. (Why? From the dew')
If the cow seeks refuge in the shade, the calf won't suckle.

Is the idea that if you are lazy, bad things will happen'

updated JUN 6, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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It sounds to me like a way of saying that what affects the parents affects the children -- but then, I'm not a very good guesser.

updated JUN 6, 2008
posted by Natasha
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Do you think in the novela it could have meant something like

"like a frightened cow" although I can't think of why they would say it that way.

updated JUN 6, 2008
posted by motley
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So we have something like this: if the cow is frightened, then her calf can't nurse. But what does it mean as a saying'

updated JUN 6, 2008
posted by Natasha
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Hi Motley.
I think you question it's reated with the verb "Remosquear":
Mostrarse (la vaca) recelosa o asustada a causa de algun ruido o movimiento extraño. Esta palabra es usada en el campo.
Creo que también se dice remosca de forma coloquial, ya que la reacción es similar a la que se tiene cuando tratan de deshacerse de un tipo de moscas que molestan al ganado vacuno (llamadas tábanos en México)

I faund in the Diccionario de sinonimos "SIGNUM".
Remosquear = asustar.

updated JUN 6, 2008
posted by Vernic
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I was thinking mamá
I understand that cria can be baby, litter, raise

updated JUN 5, 2008
posted by motley
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Remosca was on the telenovela, which is Mexican. I couldn't find the word in any dictionary, so I searched the web & came up with that, but no translation.In the novela, I'm sure they didn't say anything about cows.

http://www.sabidurias.com/tags/remosca/es/17916

updated JUN 5, 2008
posted by motley
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If it had had one, the sentence would have made no sense whatsoever: the calf not mum.'''

updated JUN 5, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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I am aware of the problem with spelling, and that's why I changed it in the end to just "mum" (I excted this reaction from Americans). However, in British English the spelling for the nasty walking Pharaohs and for calling your mother affectionately is exactly the same: mummy.

updated JUN 5, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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motley, is this a saying? Maybe we could think of a similar English saying. The one that comes to mind is that you can lead a horse to water but you can't make him drink -- although that's probably completely wrong in its connotation!

updated JUN 5, 2008
posted by Natasha