HomeQ&ADeep verbs -- Multiple meanings

Deep verbs -- Multiple meanings

6
votes

I am looking to collect and study what I call deep verbs, or verbs which have multiple (unrelated) meanings.

One example is "quedar" -- fitting clothes, stay right here, location, condition, opinion/impression, etc.

Can you give me some other common examples. I want to spend some of my vocab time focusing on these words.

thanks

8763 views
updated NOV 14, 2013
posted by cdowis
Nice post-- I think we will all be able to benefit from this one - MeEncantanCarasSonrisas, MAY 27, 2010

13 Answers

3
votes

Tomar - to take, to drink

This concerns the same verb, but different meanings in the preterite and imperfect. It may not be of interest to you, but here goes.

saber - to know

Preterite - means to find out
Supe la información esta mañana. I found out the information this morning.

Imperfect - means to know
Sabía que mi primo iba a venir. I knew that my cousin was going to come.

conocer - to know/be familiar with

Preterite - to meet for the first time

Conocí a Margarita ayer. I met Margarita yesterday (for the first time).

Conocía bien la ciudad porque vivía allá. I knew/was familiar with the city because I lived there.

updated JUN 21, 2010
posted by Delores--Lindsey
3
votes

As eloquently described in previous posts, llevar has many meanings.

updated JUN 21, 2010
posted by waltico
3
votes

dejar has about a million different meanings

updated JUN 3, 2010
posted by MeEncantanCarasSonrisas
2
votes

Tirar is the one I have the most problems with.

updated JUN 21, 2010
posted by indysidnarayan
2
votes

Hmm, does 'acabar' qualify?

updated JUN 21, 2010
posted by margaretbl
I like it. - cdowis, MAY 28, 2010
1
vote

This post is similar to yours... except that it doesn't use just verbs, it talks about nouns too, if you're interested.

updated JUL 12, 2010
posted by MeEncantanCarasSonrisas
thanks - cdowis, JUL 12, 2010
1
vote

responder ==

to vouch for

to give a response

to be acountable/responsible for

updated JUN 21, 2010
edited by cdowis
posted by cdowis
1
vote

Hmmmm.... interesting. The tense always has an effect on the meaning, of course.

updated JUN 21, 2010
edited by cdowis
posted by cdowis
1
vote

What about quedar?

updated JUN 21, 2010
posted by TheSilentHero
Already mentioned in the first post. - cdowis, MAY 28, 2010
1
vote

Good question.

Tener is used for "tengo hambre" and "tengo veinte años", but the basic meaning is the same, "to have". But I am looking more for words like "quedar" which has several unrelated meanings. I guess it is a matter of degree.

Any suggestions would be appreciated.

updated JUN 21, 2010
edited by cdowis
posted by cdowis
1
vote

It hardly seems worth inventing a term to describe such words/verbs. A word which has no synonyms (excepting very specific technical terms) is something of an exception.

updated JUN 21, 2010
posted by samdie
0
votes

some that I'm trying to work on: caer, sacar, quedar, llevar, poner, echar, caber, dar, tomar, quedar.....

updated NOV 14, 2013
posted by Agreen490
0
votes

Not to mention simple little things like "tener" and "hacer".

Do you distinguish between "meanings" and "translations"? The two are close but not identical.

updated JUL 12, 2010
posted by geofc
I am more interested in different meanings, such as quedar "located" and "wear (clothers)" - cdowis, JUL 12, 2010
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