HomeQ&AWhat does "órale" mean"

What does "órale" mean"

2
votes

Watching a movie tonight, in some of the scenes they would use the word órale, from one gangbanger to another. I got the spelling from the on-screen captions. Could it be 'pray for him'? If so, it just wouldn't make sense.

For example, after a line in the movie "put him up, shut him up" the other gangbanger said "órale. vamos"

6353 views
updated JUL 8, 2011
posted by Jack-OBrien
you pray for him,before i due the unthinkable to him??? - 0063492c, FEB 1, 2010

6 Answers

3
votes

It means:

Sure!; OK!; Come on!; Right!

In the movie it probably meant, Ok, Let's Go!

updated JUL 8, 2011
edited by Rolest
posted by Rolest
Thank you Rolest. I asked a couple of Mexican guys and they confirmed your answer :~) - Jack-OBrien, FEB 3, 2010
2
votes

I wonder why it is not in the dictionary?


órale.

  1. interj. coloq. Méx. U. para exhortar.

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SD dictionary

Need we mention which corner that you should go sit in?

updated JUL 8, 2011
edited by 0074b507
posted by 0074b507
Silly me ..... it is in the dictionary. It must be used as a slang word. I hear it often. - Daniel, JUL 8, 2011
2
votes

Orale is like an agreement. Saying Ok, let's do it. Or yea I agree with what your saying. It's informal to use, it's not really a word.

updated JUL 8, 2011
posted by lilrobchretien15
1
vote

"Órale" is slang ( at least in Mexico). It is not normally heard in the ivory towers.

There are several meanings to this word; it can be used to express: surprise, admiration, being upset, agreement, disagreement, irritation, exhortation.

Google it and you will find it in many places.

updated JUL 8, 2011
edited by Agora
posted by Agora
1
vote

It is "órale" with a accent on the ó. I translate as "go for it" or "okay", "Right!" I think "Go for it" is probably the best.

"órale" is very common -- I wonder why it is not in the dictionary?

updated JUL 8, 2011
posted by Daniel
0
votes

Hey "Qfreed" here is another one .... "Flaquito" I was told it means "Sweetheart"

Have you heard this?

updated JUL 8, 2011
posted by Daniel
Nah, it's the diminutive of flaco, skinny/thin but would be used in a friendly context. People use all kinds of diminutised adjectives to refer to each other - negrito/a, gordito/a, monita/o and loads more... - afowen, JUL 8, 2011
Ah .... that makes much more sense. Thanks I knew it was used in a friendly way. - Daniel, JUL 8, 2011
Goodness Afowen! and i thought México had the corner on diminutives! - pacofinkler, JUL 8, 2011
Well, it can be used as a term of endearment, just depends on the couple or context... I was under the impression "viejo/a" was pejorative but a friend from México told me othewise :) - cristalino, JUL 8, 2011
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