HomeQ&A¿Qué significa "poner toda la carne en el asador"?

¿Qué significa "poner toda la carne en el asador"?

2
votes

According to Google translator it means "putting all the eggs in one basket". It does sound right to me. (Plus, I'm pleasantly surprised that a machine translator does translate idioms!)

However, according to the Spanish idiom dictionary, it means "pull out all the stops"

Well, I'm still learning English as well, but these two translations seem to have totally different meanings. Can anybody tell me which one is right?

By the way, I found the phrase in my Spanish textbook, and the link to the Idiom dictionary here, but I can't remember which user posted it (my bet is on Moe, but I could be wrong).

9076 views
updated NOV 25, 2009
posted by sofiasonja
Thanks for the link to the idiom dictionary!! I didn't have that one. - BobK, NOV 25, 2009
good question sofia - 00494d19, NOV 25, 2009

6 Answers

1
vote

In English, "putting all eggs in one basket and "all your money on one horse" imply that you are taking a no necessary risk.

In Spanish, "poner toda la carne en el asador" and "echar la casa por la ventana" means that you are being extremely generous (with your time, money or effort) to achieve a goal.

Los vecinos echaron la casa por la ventana para celebrar la boda de su hija menor.

The neighbors spent a fortune to celebrate the wedding of their younger daughter.

(They even got a mortgage just to be able to pay the bills)

Mi hermano puso toda la carne en el asador para convencer al padre de su novia para que les dejara casarse.

My brother gave it all he has got to convince his girlfriend's father to allow them to be married. (My brother even took his girlfriend's whole family on a cruise by the Mediterranean Sea.)

updated NOV 25, 2009
edited by Mokay
posted by Mokay
on a cruise - nizhoni1, NOV 25, 2009
Thank you. - Mokay, NOV 25, 2009
2
votes

With the sense of including everything in place, I would think that it would be putting all your eggs in one basket. In a sense, I think of it as putting all your hope in one place.

Pulling out all the stops has a bit different meaning...

In organ music terminology, a “stop” is both a set of pipes, all tuned to the same note, that play simultaneously when the organist presses any key on the keyboard, and the knob or handle that activates each set of pipes. When an organist pulls out a stop, she activates the pipes associated with that stop.

Knowing that, I figure out that “pulling out all the stops” is an expression for doing everything possible to achieve a goal.

updated NOV 25, 2009
posted by aloshek
2
votes

Word Reference link

SpanishDict link

These are two links to help.

I think it is more likely that it means to go for broke, like betting it all on one horse.

updated NOV 25, 2009
edited by aloshek
posted by aloshek
Hmm... I didn't think about that, buen sugerencia! :) - LAtINaPunKROcKerAConFundidA, NOV 25, 2009
Me neither, wouldn't have thought of looking in Dictionary instead of Translation. Thanks! - sofiasonja, NOV 25, 2009
Gracias, damas. - aloshek, NOV 25, 2009
1
vote

Literally it means "To put all the meat on the grill" but in this case, I believe that "Pulling out all the stops" is more likely what you're looking for. smile

updated NOV 25, 2009
posted by LAtINaPunKROcKerAConFundidA
0
votes

Both expressions are possible, can be interpreted both ways:

putting all eggs in one basket, all your money on one horse....

I like the translator attempt, amazing, jeje

updated NOV 25, 2009
posted by 00494d19
0
votes

¡Muchas gracias, chicas!

Still it's one vote each... so which one is it? Further to that, am I right to think that they are different at all??

updated NOV 25, 2009
posted by sofiasonja
SpanishDict is the world's most popular Spanish-English dictionary, translation, and learning website.
© Curiosity Media Inc.