speed up

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Listen to an audio pronunciation
Usage note
When used as part of this verb phrase, the past and past participle forms of the verb "to speed" are "sped" or "speeded."
speed up(
spid
 
uhp
)
An intransitive verb phrase is a phrase that combines a verb with a preposition or other particle and does not require a direct object (e.g. Everybody please stand up.).
intransitive verb phrase
1. (to move faster)
a. acelerar (vehicle)
Every time I tried to pass him, the car in front sped up.El auto que tenía delante aceleraba cada vez que intentaba adelantarlo.
b. acelerarse (process)
Warm weather causes plant growth to speed up.Cuando hace calor, el crecimiento de las plantas se acelera.
c. darse prisa (person)
If you don't speed up, we'll never get there in time.Si no te das prisa, es imposible que lleguemos a tiempo.
d. apresurarse (person)
I speeded up when I realized I didn't have enough time to finish the exam.Me apresuré al darme cuenta de que no iba a tener tiempo de acabar el examen.
e. apurarse (person)
Regionalism used in Latin America: all the countries in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Does not include Spain.
(Latin America)
I wish the people in front would speed up. I hate dawdling along.¿Por qué no se apurarán los de adelante? Odio ir tan despacio.
f. apretar el paso (person on foot)
The man sped up when he realized I was following him.El hombre apretó el paso al darse cuenta de que yo lo seguía.
A transitive verb phrase is a phrase that combines a verb with a preposition or other particle and requires a direct object (e.g. Take out the trash.).
transitive verb phrase
2. (to cause to move faster)
a. acelerar (process)
The government wants to speed up the implementation of the new law.El gobierno quiere acelerar la implementación de la nueva ley.
b. meter prisa a (a person or an animal)
I tried to speed the cows up by prodding them with a stick.Intenté meter prisa a las vacas dándoles con un palo.
c. apresurar (a person or an animal)
Richard won't be sped up. He likes to do things at his own pace.Richard no se deja apresurar. Le gusta hacer las cosas a su ritmo.
d. apurar (a person or an animal)
Regionalism used in Latin America: all the countries in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Does not include Spain.
(Latin America)
The builders are taking too long over this job. Is there any way we can speed them up?Los albañiles están tardando mucho en terminar el trabajo. ¿Hay alguna manera de apurarlos?
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speed up
A transitive verb phrase is a phrase that combines a verb with a preposition or other particle and requires a direct object (e.g. Take out the trash.).
transitive verb phrase
1. (process)
a. acelerar
2. (person)
a. apresurar
An intransitive verb is one that does not require a direct object (e.g. The man sneezed.).
3. (car)
a. acelerar
4. (process)
a. acelerarse
5. (person)
a. apresurarse
b. apurarse
Regionalism used in Latin America: all the countries in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Does not include Spain.
(Latin America)
Copyright © 2006 Harrap Publishers Limited
speed upspeeded up (past)
verb:intransitive:plus_adverb
[+person] apresurarse; apurarse; (LAm) [+process] acelerarse;
transitive verb
[+object] acelerar
I took steps to speed up a solution to the problem He pushed a lever that speeded up the car
[+person] apresurar; apurar; (LAm)
Collins Complete Spanish Electronic Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
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