Quick answer
"Wait for me" is an intransitive verb phrase which is often translated as "esperarme", and "I beg you" is a phrase which is often translated as "te suplico". Learn more about the difference between "wait for me" and "I beg you" below.
wait for me
An intransitive verb phrase is a phrase that combines a verb with a preposition or other particle and does not require a direct object (e.g. Everybody please stand up.).
intransitive verb phrase
1. (to hold on)
a. esperarme
Will you please wait for me after the show? We can walk home together.Por favor, ¿me puedes esperar después del espectáculo? Podemos caminar a casa juntos.
A phrase is a group of words commonly used together (e.g once upon a time).
phrase
2. (imperative)
a. espérame
A word of phrase used to refer to the second person informal “tú” by their conjugation or implied context (e.g. How are you?).
(informal)
(singular)
I'll be home soon. Wait for me.Voy a llegar a casa pronto. Espérame.
b. espérenme (plural)
Wait for me, guys! I'm tying my shoes.¡Espérenme, chicos! Me estoy atando los zapatos.
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I beg you
A phrase is a group of words commonly used together (e.g once upon a time).
phrase
1. (general)
a. te suplico
A word of phrase used to refer to the second person informal “tú” by their conjugation or implied context (e.g. How are you?).
(informal)
(singular)
Don't leave me. I beg you to stay.No me dejes. Te suplico que te quedes.
b. le suplico
A word or phrase used to refer to the second person formal “usted” by their conjugation or implied context (e.g. usted).
(formal)
(singular)
I beg you to reconsider your decision.Le suplico que revise su decisión.
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