Quick answer
"Lose yourself" is an intransitive verb phrase which is often translated as "distraerte", and "get lost" is an intransitive verb phrase which is often translated as "perderse". Learn more about the difference between "lose yourself" and "get lost" below.
lose yourself
An intransitive verb phrase is a phrase that combines a verb with a preposition or other particle and does not require a direct object (e.g. Everybody please stand up.).
intransitive verb phrase
1.
A phrase used as a figure of speech or a word that is symbolic in meaning; metaphorical (e.g. carrot, bean).
(figurative)
(to be absorbed in)
a. distraerte
A word of phrase used to refer to the second person informal “tú” by their conjugation or implied context (e.g. How are you?).
(informal)
(singular)
Don't lose yourself in that book. We're eating dinner in 10 minutes.No te distraigas con ese libro. Vamos a cenar en 10 minutos.
b. distraerse
A word or phrase used to refer to the second person formal “usted” by their conjugation or implied context (e.g. usted).
(formal)
(singular)
If you lose yourself reading that report, you'll be late to the meeting.Si se distrae leyendo ese informe, llegará tarde a la reunión.
A phrase is a group of words commonly used together (e.g once upon a time).
phrase
2.
A phrase used as a figure of speech or a word that is symbolic in meaning; metaphorical (e.g. carrot, bean).
(figurative)
(imperative)
a. distráete
A word of phrase used to refer to the second person informal “tú” by their conjugation or implied context (e.g. How are you?).
(informal)
(singular)
Lose yourself in the beautiful beaches. It'll do you good.Distráete en las hermosas playas. Te hará bien.
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get lost(
gehd
 
last
)
An intransitive verb phrase is a phrase that combines a verb with a preposition or other particle and does not require a direct object (e.g. Everybody please stand up.).
intransitive verb phrase
1. (disoriented)
a. perderse
Look up the directions before you leave. Otherwise, you may get lost.Busca indicaciones antes de que salgas. Si no lo haces, puedes perderte.
2. (immersed)
a. perderse
I love listening to the orchestra. You can just get lost in the music.Me encanta escuchar a la orquesta. Realmente puedes perderse en la música.
3.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(to go away)
a. irse
Tell that kid to get lost.Dile a ese chamaco que se vaya.
b. irse al diablo
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Mark wants to talk to you. - I don't care. He can get lost.Mark quiere hablar contigo. - Me vale. Se puede ir al diablo.
A phrase is a group of words commonly used together (e.g once upon a time).
phrase
4.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(imperative)
a. vete
Can't you see I'm busy? Get lost!¿No ves que estoy ocupado? ¡Vete!
b. vete al diablo
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
You're a liar. Get lost!Eres un mentiroso. ¡Vete al diablo!
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