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Quick answer
"In your face" is an interjection which is often translated as "toma", and "oh, snap" is an interjection which is often translated as "vaya". Learn more about the difference between "in your face" and "oh, snap" below.
in your face(
ihn
 
yawr
 
feys
)
An interjection is a short utterance that expresses emotion, hesitation, or protest (e.g. Wow!).
1.
A phrase used as a figure of speech or a word that is symbolic in meaning; metaphorical (e.g. carrot, bean).
(figurative)
A very informal word or phrase used by a particular group or community as a substitute for standard language (e.g. joint, john).
(slang)
(used to express defiance)
Regionalism used in the United States
(United States)
a. toma
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
We won again! In your face!¡Ganamos otra vez! ¡Toma!
b. toma en los morros
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
You dared me to eat a dozen donuts, and I did it. In your face!Me retaste a comerme una docena de rosquillas, y lo hice. ¡Toma en los morros!
c. tomá
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Argentina
(Argentina)
Guess who's going out with Carolina. Me! In your face!Adivina quien tiene una cita con Carolina. ¡Yo! ¡Tomá!
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oh, snap
An interjection is a short utterance that expresses emotion, hesitation, or protest (e.g. Wow!).
1.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(expression of surprise)
a. vaya
Oh, snap! Did you really just say that?¡Vaya! ¿De verdad dijiste eso?
b. caramba
Oh, snap. I left my keys at the house.Caramba. Dejé las llaves en la casa.
c. rayos
Oh, snap! It's about to rain.¡Rayos! Va a llover.
d. pucha
Regionalism used in Latin America: all the countries in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Does not include Spain.
(Latin America)
Oh, snap! We're going the wrong way.¡Pucha! vamos en la dirección equivocada.
2.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(taunt)
a. toma
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
Rob was fired today. I'm so glad I don't have to work with him anymore. - Oh, snap!Rob fue despedido hoy. Me alegro tanto de que ya no tengo que trabajar con él. - ¡Toma!
b. tómala
Regionalism used in Latin America: all the countries in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Does not include Spain.
(Latin America)
Jack beat me by ten points. - Oh, snap! You got schooled!Jack me ganó por diez puntos. ¡Tómala! ¡Te derrotó!
c. tomá
Regionalism used in Argentina
(Argentina)
I made a particularly strong "your mama" joke and Leo punched me in the face. - Oh, snap, bro!Hice un chiste de "tu mamá" particularmente fuerte y Leo me dio un puñetazo en la cara. - ¡Tomá, che!
d. cómo te quedó el ojo
Regionalism used in Latin America: all the countries in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Does not include Spain.
(Latin America)
Cristina broke up with me and I saw her with some other guy the next day. - Oh, snap!Cristina terminó conmigo y la vi con otro tipo el próximo día. - ¡Cómo te quedó el ojo¡
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