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Quick answer
"Get on with" is a transitive verb phrase which is often translated as "seguir con", and "get along" is an intransitive verb phrase which is often translated as "marcharse". Learn more about the difference between "get on with" and "get along" below.
get on with(
gehd
 
an
 
wihth
)
A transitive verb phrase is a phrase that combines a verb with a preposition or other particle and requires a direct object (e.g. Take out the trash.).
transitive verb phrase
1. (to continue)
a. seguir con
Forget what happened and get on with your normal life.Olvida lo ocurrido y sigue con tu vida normal.
b. continuar con
You must be busy. I'll let you get on with your work.Estarás ocupado. Te dejo que continúes con tu trabajo.
2. (to make progress with) (United Kingdom)
a. avanzar en
How are you getting on with your studies?¿Qué tal avanzas en tus estudios?
b. avanzar con
I think Michael is getting on with his report and he'll have it finished tomorrow.Creo que Michael está avanzando con el informe y lo tendrá acabado mañana.
c.
This refers to an idiomatic word or phrase for which there is no word-for-word translation.
no direct translation
How are you getting on with your homework?¿Cómo llevas las tareas?
Stop fooling around and get on with it!¡Deja de hacer el tonto y ponte a ello de una vez!
3. (to get along with) (United Kingdom)
a. llevarse bien con
I never really got on with my parents.En realidad nunca me llevé bien con mis papás.
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get along(
giht
 
uh
-
lang
)
An intransitive verb phrase is a phrase that combines a verb with a preposition or other particle and does not require a direct object (e.g. Everybody please stand up.).
intransitive verb phrase
1. (to leave)
a. marcharse
We ought to get along or we will not arrive to the party in time.Debemos marcharnos o no llegaremos a la fiesta a tiempo.
b. irse
He wants to get along now, so that he can get ahead of traffic.Quiere irse ahora para poder adelantarse al tráfico.
2. (to cope)
a. arreglárselas
We were all worried about Martin after his divorce, but he seems to be getting along without his ex-wife.Todos nos preocupamos por Martin después de su divorcio, pero parece que se las arregla sin su exesposa.
3. (to progress)
a.
This refers to an idiomatic word or phrase for which there is no word-for-word translation.
no direct translation
How is he getting along in his recovery?¿Cómo le va con su recuperación?
It is okay that they didn't join us on the trip. We are getting along fine without them.Está bien que no nos acompañaran en el viaje. Vamos bien sin ellos.
4. (to have a good relationship)
a. llevarse bien
Although you should be strict, you should also get along with your employees, so that they respect you.Aunque debes ser estricto, debes llevarte bien con tus empleados para que te respeten.
An interjection is a short utterance that expresses emotion, hesitation, or protest (e.g. Wow!).
5. (used to dismiss somebody)
a. ¡vete!
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(singular)
There are too many people in this kitchen. Get along with you now!Hay demasiadas personas en esta cocina. ¡Vete ya!
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