Quick answer
"Fall over" is an intransitive verb phrase which is often translated as "caerse", and "fall down" is an intransitive verb phrase which is also often translated as "caerse". Learn more about the difference between "fall over" and "fall down" below.
fall over
An intransitive verb phrase is a phrase that combines a verb with a preposition or other particle and does not require a direct object (e.g. Everybody please stand up.).
intransitive verb phrase
1. (to tip over)
a. caerse
The exhausted security guard fell over on the ground and didn't even wake up.El guardia de seguridad se cayó al suelo y ni siquiera se despertó.
A transitive verb phrase is a phrase that combines a verb with a preposition or other particle and requires a direct object (e.g. Take out the trash.).
transitive verb phrase
2. (to trip)
a. tropezar con
Grant fell over the coffee table looking for the remote in the dark.Grant tropezó con la mesa de centro buscando el control a oscuras.
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fall down(
fal
 
daun
)
An intransitive verb phrase is a phrase that combines a verb with a preposition or other particle and does not require a direct object (e.g. Everybody please stand up.).
intransitive verb phrase
1. (to descend)
a. caerse
He got too close to the edge and fell down the cliff.Se acercó demasiado al borde y se cayó por el acantilado.
2. (to collapse)
a. derrumbarse
After three hundred years, the wall finally fell down.Después de trescientos años, el muro finalmente se derrumbó.
3. (to fail)
a. fracasar
They fell down on the job, and now we are all suffering the consequences.Fracasaron en el trabajo, y ahora todos estamos sufriendo las consecuencias.
b. fallar
The plan started off strong, but fell down in several key areas.El plan comenzó muy bien, pero falló en varias áreas clave.
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