Quick answer
"Diente" is a noun which is often translated as "tooth", and "sacar una muela" is an intransitive verb phrase which is often translated as "to pull a molar". Learn more about the difference between "diente" and "sacar una muela" below.
diente(
dyehn
-
teh
)
A masculine noun is used with masculine articles and adjectives (e.g. el hombre guapo, el sol amarillo).
1. (anatomy)
a. tooth
Mi hermana tiene un diente de oro.My sister has a gold tooth.
Por favor, cepíllate los dientes; tu aliento apesta.Please brush your teeth; your breath stinks.
b. fang
La serpiente usa sus dientes para inyectar el veneno.The serpent uses its fangs to inject poison.
2. (part of a fork)
a. tine
¿Cuántos dientes normalmente tiene un tenedor?How many tines does a fork normally have?
b. prong
Los dientes de estos tenedores de plástico se rompen a cada rato.The prongs of these plastic forks break all the time.
3. (part of a saw)
a. tooth
Cuidado que no toques los dientes de la sierra, que te cortas.Be careful not to touch the teeth of the saw, or you'll get cut.
Copyright © Curiosity Media Inc.
sacar una muela
An intransitive verb phrase is a phrase that combines a verb with a preposition or other particle and does not require a direct object (e.g. Everybody please stand up.).
intransitive verb phrase
1. (general)
a. to pull a molar
Sacar una muela puede resultar muy doloroso.Pulling a molar can be very painful.
b. to extract a molar
El dentista dijo que no es necesario sacar una muela.The dentist said it's not necessary to extract a molar.
Copyright © Curiosity Media Inc.
SpanishDict is the world's most popular Spanish-English dictionary, translation, and learning website.
© Curiosity Media Inc.  |  Ver en español
SOCIAL NETWORKS
APPS