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"Dar atole con el dedo" is a transitive verb phrase which is often translated as "to try to pull one over on", and "tomar el pelo" is a transitive verb phrase which is often translated as "to pull someone's leg". Learn more about the difference between "dar atole con el dedo" and "tomar el pelo" below.
dar atole con el dedo(
dahr
 
ah
-
toh
-
leh
 
kohn
 
ehl
 
deh
-
doh
)
A transitive verb phrase is a phrase that combines a verb with a preposition or other particle and requires a direct object (e.g. Take out the trash.).
transitive verb phrase
1. (idiom) (to attempt to trick)
Regionalism used in Mexico
(Mexico)
a. to try to pull one over on (idiom)
Oye, ese cuate te está dando atole con el dedo. Ponte abusado.Hey, that guy's trying to pull one over on you. Look sharp.
b. to take for a fool (idiom)
¿Cómo ves esta oferta de una casa gratis en Cancún? - Creo que te están dando atole con el dedo.What do you think of this offer for a free house in Cancun? - I think they're taking you for a fool.
c. to treat like an idiot
No me des atole con el dedo, que no nací ayer.Don't treat me like an idiot. I wasn't born yesterday.
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tomar el pelo(
toh
-
mahr
 
ehl
 
peh
-
loh
)
A transitive verb phrase is a phrase that combines a verb with a preposition or other particle and requires a direct object (e.g. Take out the trash.).
transitive verb phrase
1.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
A phrase used as a figure of speech or a word that is symbolic in meaning; metaphorical (e.g. carrot, bean).
(figurative)
(to poke fun at)
a. to pull someone's leg
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
A phrase used as a figure of speech or a word that is symbolic in meaning; metaphorical (e.g. carrot, bean).
(figurative)
No le hagas caso a tu padre, te está tomando el pelo. Claro que te compramos la bici como te prometimos.Don't listen to your father; he's pulling your leg. Of course we'll buy you the bike like we promised.
b. to joke
Nos dijeron que su equipo ganó una vez al Barça, pero yo creo que nos estaban tomando el pelo.They told us their team beat Barça once, but I think they were only joking.
c. to tease
Deja de tomarme el pelo y dime si el vestido me queda bien o no de verdad.Stop teasing me and tell me if the dress really suits me or doesn't.
2.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(to swindle)
a. to rip off
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
¿Nueve euros por una cerveza? Os tomaron descaradamente el pelo.Nine euros for a beer? They have shamelessly ripped you off.
tomarse el pelo
A pronominal verb phrase combines a verb with a preposition or other particle and always uses a reflexive pronoun. (e.g. Se dio cuenta del problema.)
pronominal verb phrase
3.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(to poke fun at each other)
a. to pull each other's leg
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Los dos hermanos andan siempre tomándose el pelo. Es su forma de relacionarse.The two brothers are always pulling each other's leg. It's their way of relating to each other.
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