Quick answer
"Countable" is an adjective which is often translated as "contable", and "uncountable" is an adjective which is often translated as "continuo". Learn more about the difference between "countable" and "uncountable" below.
countable
An adjective is a word that describes a noun (e.g. the big dog).
1. (general)
a. contable
To my surprise, I learned that some infinite sets can be either countable or uncountable.Para mi sorpresa, aprendí que algunos conjuntos infinitos pueden ser contables o incontables.
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uncountable
An adjective is a word that describes a noun (e.g. the big dog).
1. (grammar)
a. continuo
Although the noun "grapes" is countable in English, it is uncountable in French.Aunque el sustantivo "uvas" es discontinuo en inglés, en francés, es continuo.
b. no contable
You typically can't pluralize uncountable nouns like "sugar."Generalmente no se puede pluralizar sustantivos no contables como "azúcar".
2. (numerous)
a. incontable
With the uncountable obstacles in our way, our proposal will never get approved.Con los obstáculos incontables en nuestro camino, nunca aprobarán nuestra propuesta.
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