Quick answer
"Come to my house" is an intransitive verb phrase which is often translated as "venir a mi casa", and "come over to my house" is an intransitive verb phrase which is also often translated as "venir a mi casa". Learn more about the difference between "come to my house" and "come over to my house" below.
come to my house(
kuhm
 
tu
 
may
 
haus
)
An intransitive verb phrase is a phrase that combines a verb with a preposition or other particle and does not require a direct object (e.g. Everybody please stand up.).
intransitive verb phrase
1. (to go to my house)
a. venir a mi casa
My friends are going to come to my house and we are going to study together.Mis amigos van a venir a mi casa y vamos a estudiar juntos.
A phrase is a group of words commonly used together (e.g once upon a time).
phrase
2. (imperative)
a. ven a mi casa
A word of phrase used to refer to the second person informal “tú” by their conjugation or implied context (e.g. How are you?).
(informal)
(singular)
Don't spend Christmas alone. Come to my house!No pases la Navidad solo. ¡Ven a mi casa!
b. vengan a mi casa
A word of phrase used to refer to the second person informal “tú” by their conjugation or implied context (e.g. How are you?).
(informal)
(plural)
Pick up Mark and Linda and come to my house at nine thirty.Recoge a Mark y Linda y vengan a mi casa a las nueve y media.
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come over to my house
An intransitive verb phrase is a phrase that combines a verb with a preposition or other particle and does not require a direct object (e.g. Everybody please stand up.).
intransitive verb phrase
1. (to go to my house)
a. venir a mi casa
It was raining and we couldn't play outside, so I told my friends to come over to my house.Llovía y no podíamos jugar fuera, así que les dije a mis amigos que vinieran a mi casa.
A phrase is a group of words commonly used together (e.g once upon a time).
phrase
2. (imperative; used to address one person)
a. ven a mi casa
A word of phrase used to refer to the second person informal “tú” by their conjugation or implied context (e.g. How are you?).
(informal)
(singular)
If you don't have anywhere to stay, come over to my house.Si no tienes dónde quedarte, ven a mi casa.
3. (imperative; used to address multiple people)
a. vengan a mi casa (plural)
Come over to my house, guys. We can have a party!Vengan a mi casa, chicos. ¡Podemos hacer una fiesta!
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