Quick answer
"Come over here" is an intransitive verb phrase which is often translated as "venir aquí", and "over there" is an adverb which is often translated as "allá". Learn more about the difference between "come over here" and "over there" below.
come over here(
kuhm
 
o
-
vuhr
 
hir
)
An intransitive verb phrase is a phrase that combines a verb with a preposition or other particle and does not require a direct object (e.g. Everybody please stand up.).
intransitive verb phrase
1. (to move toward this place)
a. venir aquí
If I don't get home on time today, my mom won't let me come over here again.Si no llego a casa a tiempo hoy, mi mamá no me dejará venir aquí otra vez.
b. venir para acá
If you come over here, you'll be able to see it better.Si vienes para acá, lo podrás ver mejor.
A phrase is a group of words commonly used together (e.g once upon a time).
phrase
2. (imperative)
a. vente para acá
A word of phrase used to refer to the second person informal “tú” by their conjugation or implied context (e.g. How are you?).
(informal)
(singular)
Come over here, Miguel. Look at how you've grown!Vente para acá, Miguel. ¡Mira cómo has crecido!
b. ven aquí
A word of phrase used to refer to the second person informal “tú” by their conjugation or implied context (e.g. How are you?).
(informal)
(singular)
Come over here so I can give you a hug.Ven aquí para darte un abrazo.
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over there(
o
-
vuhr
 
thehr
)
An adverb is a word that describes a verb, an adjective, or other adverbs (e.g. to run quickly, very tired).
1. (at a distance)
a. allá
My friends are waiting for me over there at the coffee shop.Mis amigas me están esperando allá en la cafetería.
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