Quick answer
"Come out" is an intransitive verb phrase which is often translated as "salir", and "walk away" is an intransitive verb phrase which is often translated as "irse". Learn more about the difference between "come out" and "walk away" below.
come out(
kuhm
 
aut
)
An intransitive verb phrase is a phrase that combines a verb with a preposition or other particle and does not require a direct object (e.g. Everybody please stand up.).
intransitive verb phrase
1. (to go out)
a. salir
The sun came out.Salió el sol.
2. (to leave; used with "of")
a. salir de
When she came out of the hospital, she had to use a wheelchair.Tuvo que usar una silla de ruedas al salir del hospital.
3. (to disappear)
a. quitarse
This stain on my shirt won't come out.Esta mancha en mi camisa no se quita.
b. salir
I spilled wine on my white couch, and now it won't come out.Derramé vino en mi sofá blanco, y ahora no sale.
4. (to turn out)
a. salir
I was trying to paint a portrait of my niece, but it didn't come out very well.Intentaba pintar un retrato de mi sobrina, pero no salió muy bien.
5. (to be released)
a. estrenarse (movie)
The first Stars Wars movie came out in 1976.La primera película de Star Wars se estrenó en 1976.
b. salir (movie or publication)
Her first novel comes out next month.Su primera novela sale el próximo mes.
c. publicarse (publication)
Our newspaper comes out once a week.Nuestro periódico sale una vez a la semana.
6. (to become detached)
a. caerse
I think that molar is about to come out.Creo que esa muela está por caerse.
7. (to make known one's sexuality)
a. declararse
I want to come out to my parents, but it's really scary.Quiero declararme a mis padres, pero es muy aterrador.
b. declararse homosexual
Her family was very supportive of her when she came out.Su familia le dio todo su apoyo cuando se declaró homosexual.
c. salir del clóset
Regionalism used in Latin America: all the countries in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Does not include Spain.
(Latin America)
No one was particularly surprised when he finally came out.Nadie se extrañó demasiado cuando por fin salió del clóset.
8. (to be revealed)
a. salir a la luz
Everyone was shocked when the corruption scandal came out.Todos se asombraron cuando el escándalo de corrupción salió a la luz.
b. divulgarse
The whole nation mourned when the news of the president's death came out.Todo el país lloró la muerte del presidente cuando se divulgó la noticia.
9. (to open)
a. salir (flower)
The flowers don't come out until May here.Las flores no salen hasta mayo por aquí.
10. (to be said)
a. salir
I tried to make a flirtatious remark to her, but all that came out were mumbles.Traté de decirle un piropo, pero tan solo me salieron unos balbuceos.
11. (to total)
a. salir a
The scarf and the purse came out to almost $800.El pañuelo y el bolso salieron a casi $800.
12.
A word or phrase that is seldom used in contemporary language and is recognized as being from another decade, (e.g. cat, groovy).
(old-fashioned)
(to enter society)
a. presentarse en sociedad
I remember how excited I was to come out when I was a debutante.Recuerdo lo emocionada que estaba de presentarme en sociedad cuando era debutante.
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walk away
An intransitive verb phrase is a phrase that combines a verb with a preposition or other particle and does not require a direct object (e.g. Everybody please stand up.).
intransitive verb phrase
1. (to move off)
a. irse
When I went up to her to say hello, she turned around and walked away.Cuando me acerqué para saludarla, se dio la vuelta y se fue.
b. marcharse
It's so unlike Tom to walk away from the party without saying good-bye.Qué raro que Tom se marchara de la fiesta sin despedirse.
c. alejarse
I saw Jan walk away from her friends and make for the station.Vi que Jan se alejaba de sus amigos y se dirigía hacia la estación.
2. (to abandon a situation)
a. marcharse
I was so fed up with my job I just walked away one day without saying anything.Estaba tan harta de mi trabajo que un día agarré y me marché sin decir nada.
3. (to refuse to deal with; often used with "from")
a. desentenderse de
I know he's a very difficult person, but he's my father, and I could never walk away from him.Sé que es una persona muy difícil, pero es mi padre y yo sería incapaz de desentenderme de él.
4. (to be uninjured)
a. salir
The passenger in the vehicle was killed, but the driver walked away unhurt.El pasajero que iba en el vehículo murió, pero el chofer salió ileso.
b. salir ileso
It's incredible that he could walk away from such a terrible accident.Es increíble que saliera ileso de un accidente tan terrible.
5. (to win; used with "with")
a. llevarse
This movie walked away with just about every award going.Esta película se llevó casi todos los galardones posibles.
6. (to steal; used with "with")
a. llevarse
It was raining outside, so she walked away with someone else's umbrella pretending that it was hers.Fuera llovía, así que se llevó el paraguas de otra persona fingiendo que era suyo.
Copyright © Curiosity Media Inc.
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