Quick answer
"Come out" is an intransitive verb phrase which is often translated as "salir", and "come along" is an intransitive verb phrase which is often translated as "venir". Learn more about the difference between "come out" and "come along" below.
come out(
kuhm
 
aut
)
An intransitive verb phrase is a phrase that combines a verb with a preposition or other particle and does not require a direct object (e.g. Everybody please stand up.).
intransitive verb phrase
1. (to go out)
a. salir
The sun came out.Salió el sol.
2. (to leave; used with "of")
a. salir de
When she came out of the hospital, she had to use a wheelchair.Tuvo que usar una silla de ruedas al salir del hospital.
3. (to disappear)
a. quitarse
This stain on my shirt won't come out.Esta mancha en mi camisa no se quita.
b. salir
I spilled wine on my white couch, and now it won't come out.Derramé vino en mi sofá blanco, y ahora no sale.
4. (to turn out)
a. salir
I was trying to paint a portrait of my niece, but it didn't come out very well.Intentaba pintar un retrato de mi sobrina, pero no salió muy bien.
5. (to be released)
a. estrenarse (movie)
The first Stars Wars movie came out in 1976.La primera película de Star Wars se estrenó en 1976.
b. salir (movie or publication)
Her first novel comes out next month.Su primera novela sale el próximo mes.
c. publicarse (publication)
Our newspaper comes out once a week.Nuestro periódico sale una vez a la semana.
6. (to become detached)
a. caerse
I think that molar is about to come out.Creo que esa muela está por caerse.
7. (to make known one's sexuality)
a. declararse
I want to come out to my parents, but it's really scary.Quiero declararme a mis padres, pero es muy aterrador.
b. declararse homosexual
Her family was very supportive of her when she came out.Su familia le dio todo su apoyo cuando se declaró homosexual.
c. salir del clóset
Regionalism used in Latin America: all the countries in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Does not include Spain.
(Latin America)
No one was particularly surprised when he finally came out.Nadie se extrañó demasiado cuando por fin salió del clóset.
8. (to be revealed)
a. salir a la luz
Everyone was shocked when the corruption scandal came out.Todos se asombraron cuando el escándalo de corrupción salió a la luz.
b. divulgarse
The whole nation mourned when the news of the president's death came out.Todo el país lloró la muerte del presidente cuando se divulgó la noticia.
9. (to open)
a. salir (flower)
The flowers don't come out until May here.Las flores no salen hasta mayo por aquí.
10. (to be said)
a. salir
I tried to make a flirtatious remark to her, but all that came out were mumbles.Traté de decirle un piropo, pero tan solo me salieron unos balbuceos.
11. (to total)
a. salir a
The scarf and the purse came out to almost $800.El pañuelo y el bolso salieron a casi $800.
12.
A word or phrase that is seldom used in contemporary language and is recognized as being from another decade, (e.g. cat, groovy).
(old-fashioned)
(to enter society)
a. presentarse en sociedad
I remember how excited I was to come out when I was a debutante.Recuerdo lo emocionada que estaba de presentarme en sociedad cuando era debutante.
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come along(
kuhm
 
uh
-
lang
)
An intransitive verb phrase is a phrase that combines a verb with a preposition or other particle and does not require a direct object (e.g. Everybody please stand up.).
intransitive verb phrase
1. (to accompany; often used with "with")
a. venir
Come along with me, Sam. We're going to report this to the police right now.Ven conmigo, Sam. Ahora mismo nos vamos a la policía a denunciar esto.
b. ir
We're going to the gala this afternoon. Would you like to come along?Esta tarde nos vamos a la gala. ¿Quieres ir con nosotros?
c. acompañar (transitive verb)
I'm going to a trade fair in Manchester next week. - Can I come along?La semana próxima me voy a Manchester a una feria comercial. - ¿Puedo acompañarte?
2. (to arrive)
a. presentarse
Martina was right in the middle of telling me something interesting when David came along.Martina justo me estaba contando algo interesante cuando se presentó David.
b. llegar
You wait 40 minutes for a bus and then three come along at once.Te pasas 40 minutos esperando un autobús y luego llegan tres todos a la vez.
c. aparecer
I was eating my sandwiches in the park when Amanda Drinkwater came along and sat down on the bench beside me.Estaba en el parque comiendo mis sándwiches cuando apareció Amanda Drinkwater y se sentó en el banco a mi lado.
3. (to hurry up; used in the imperative)
a. apurarse
Come along, Sheila! We'll be late for your appointment.¡Apúrate, Sheila! Que vamos a llegar tarde a tu cita.
b. darse prisa
Come along, kids! I don't want us to miss the start of the program.¡Dense prisa, chicos! No quiero que nos perdamos el comienzo del programa.
c.
This refers to an idiomatic word or phrase for which there is no word-for-word translation.
no direct translation
Come along, boys. We can't stay here all afternoon.¡Venga, niños! No podemos quedarnos aquí toda la tarde.
Come along, Peter! We haven't got all day.¡Vamos, Peter! Que no tenemos todo el día.
4. (to cheer up; used in the imperative)
a.
This refers to an idiomatic word or phrase for which there is no word-for-word translation.
no direct translation
Come along, Fraser. You know that wasn't what I meant.¡Vamos, Fraser! Ya sabes que eso no es lo que yo quería decir.
Come along, Tina. You know I didn't mean to upset you.¡Vamos, Tina! Ya sabes que no quería ofenderte.
5. (to progress)
a. avanzar
Work on the house extension is coming along well and it should be finished by next month.Las obras de ampliación de la casa avanzan bien y deberían finalizarse antes del mes próximo.
b. marchar
Terry tells me that his plans are coming along well and that his website will soon be going live.Terry me dice que sus planes marchan bien y que falta poco para que entre en servicio su sitio web.
c. ir
How's the restoration work coming along? - Really well, thank you. We've certainly got off to a good start.¿Qué tal va la restauración? - Muy bien, gracias. Se puede decir que hemos empezado con buen pie.
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