Quick answer
"Cheapskate" is a noun which is often translated as "el tacaño", and "chill out" is an intransitive verb phrase which is often translated as "relajarse". Learn more about the difference between "cheapskate" and "chill out" below.
cheapskate(
chips
-
keyt
)
A noun is a word referring to a person, animal, place, thing, feeling or idea (e.g. man, dog, house).
1.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(general)
a. el tacaño
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
, la tacaña
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
Don't be such a cheapskate! It's not as if you don't have the money.¡No seas tacaño! Vamos, como si no tuvieras la plata.
b. el agarrado
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
, la agarrada
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Just because I like a bargain, it doesn't mean I'm a cheapskate.El hecho de que me gusten las gangas no quiere decir que sea un agarrado.
c. el roñoso
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
, la roñosa
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
My son thinks I'm a cheapskate because I won't buy him brand-name sneakers.Mi hijo cree que soy una roñosa porque no le compro zapatos deportivos de marca.
d. el codo
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
, la coda
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Latin America: all the countries in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Does not include Spain.
(Latin America)
That cheapskate is never going to pay you back the money you lent him.Ese codo nunca te va a regresar el dinero que le prestaste.
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chill out(
chihl
 
aut
)
An intransitive verb phrase is a phrase that combines a verb with a preposition or other particle and does not require a direct object (e.g. Everybody please stand up.).
intransitive verb phrase
1.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(to become relaxed)
a. relajarse
You can't just tell someone "to chill out" when they're having an anxiety attack.No basta con decirle a alguien "relájate" cuando está sufriendo una crisis de ansiedad.
b. tranquilizarse
"Hey! If you guys don't chill out, you're going to get the boot," shouted the bartender."¡Oigan! Si no se tranquilizan, se irán a la calle", gritó el barman.
c. calmarse
Hey man, you need to chill out. – But the presentation is tomorrow, and you haven't even started your portion!Vamos, muchacho, tienes que calmarte. – Pero la presentación es mañana, ¡y ni siquiera empezaste lo que te toca!
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