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Quick answer
"Bro" is a noun which is often translated as "el hermano", and "dude" is a noun which is often translated as "el tipo". Learn more about the difference between "bro" and "dude" below.
bro(
bro
)
A noun is a word referring to a person, animal, place, thing, feeling or idea (e.g. man, dog, house).
1.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(relative)
a. el hermano
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
My bro and I have been sharing a room since he was born.Mi hermano y yo hemos estado compartiendo una recámara desde que nació.
2.
A very informal word or phrase used by a particular group or community as a substitute for standard language (e.g. joint, john).
(slang)
(male friend)
a. el amigo
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
My bro is coming over after school to play video games with me.Mi amigo viene después de clases para jugar videojuegos conmigo.
b. el cuate
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
Regionalism used in Central America: Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama
(Central America)
Regionalism used in Mexico
(Mexico)
I'm going to put together a band with some of my bros.Voy a formar una banda con unos cuates.
c. el colega
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
My bro and I went for breakfast burritos before school.Mi colega y yo fuimos por unos burritos de desayuno antes de clases.
3.
A very informal word or phrase used by a particular group or community as a substitute for standard language (e.g. joint, john).
(slang)
(form of address)
a. el amigo
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
Bro, can you give me a hand with this?Amigo, ¿me ayudas con esto?
b. el hermano
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
Bro, are you alright?Hermano, ¿estás bien?
c. el compadre
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
I'll take a hot dog with everything, bro.Quiero un hot dog con todo, compadre.
d. el mano
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A very informal word or phrase used by a particular group or community as a substitute for standard language (e.g. joint, john).
(slang)
Regionalism used in Latin America: all the countries in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Does not include Spain.
(Latin America)
Bro, that's too expensive! Give me a break.Mano, ¡eso es demasiado caro! Rebájale.
e. el mae
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A very informal word or phrase used by a particular group or community as a substitute for standard language (e.g. joint, john).
(slang)
Regionalism used in Latin America: all the countries in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Does not include Spain.
(Latin America)
Lend me five dollars, bro.Préstame cinco dólares, mae.
f. el macho
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A very informal word or phrase used by a particular group or community as a substitute for standard language (e.g. joint, john).
(slang)
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
That's a nice car you're driving, bro.Eso es un lindo coche que conduces, macho.
g. el tío
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A very informal word or phrase used by a particular group or community as a substitute for standard language (e.g. joint, john).
(slang)
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
Hey, bro! What time is it?¡Oye, tío! ¿Qué hora tienes?
h. el colega
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A very informal word or phrase used by a particular group or community as a substitute for standard language (e.g. joint, john).
(slang)
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
Slow down, bro! You're talking too fast.¡Habla más lento, colega! Estás hablando demasiado rápido.
i. el güey
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A very informal word or phrase used by a particular group or community as a substitute for standard language (e.g. joint, john).
(slang)
Regionalism used in Mexico
(Mexico)
Pass me the salt, bro.Pásame la sal, güey.
j. el huevón
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A very informal word or phrase used by a particular group or community as a substitute for standard language (e.g. joint, john).
(slang)
Regionalism used in Chile
(Chile)
Let's go to the beach, bro.Vamos a la playa, huevón.
k. el boludo
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A very informal word or phrase used by a particular group or community as a substitute for standard language (e.g. joint, john).
(slang)
(River Plate)
Hey, bro! What's up?¡Che, boludo! ¿Qué onda?
4.
An offensive word or phrase used to degrade a person or group of people based on race, gender, sexual preference, etc. (e.g. ghetto).
(pejorative)
A very informal word or phrase used by a particular group or community as a substitute for standard language (e.g. joint, john).
(slang)
(unrefined young man)
a. el chusma
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
An offensive word or phrase used to degrade a person or group of people based on race, gender, sexual preference, etc. (e.g. ghetto).
(pejorative)
A very informal word or phrase used by a particular group or community as a substitute for standard language (e.g. joint, john).
(slang)
Regionalism used in Latin America: all the countries in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Does not include Spain.
(Latin America)
The pool hall has been overrun by bros. It's not a good place to take a date anymore.La sala de billar ha sido dominada por chusmas. Ya no sirve para llevar a alguien en una cita.
b. el fresón
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
An offensive word or phrase used to degrade a person or group of people based on race, gender, sexual preference, etc. (e.g. ghetto).
(pejorative)
A very informal word or phrase used by a particular group or community as a substitute for standard language (e.g. joint, john).
(slang)
Regionalism used in El Salvador
(El Salvador)
Regionalism used in Mexico
(Mexico)
All those bros ever talk about is their cars.Lo único que platican esos fresones es sus carros.
c. el naco
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
An offensive word or phrase used to degrade a person or group of people based on race, gender, sexual preference, etc. (e.g. ghetto).
(pejorative)
A very informal word or phrase used by a particular group or community as a substitute for standard language (e.g. joint, john).
(slang)
Regionalism used in Mexico
(Mexico)
Look at that bro. He thinks he's still in high school.Mira a ese naco. Cree que sigue en la prepa.
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dude(
dud
)
A noun is a word referring to a person, animal, place, thing, feeling or idea (e.g. man, dog, house).
1.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(guy)
Regionalism used in the United States
(United States)
a. el tipo
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
There were some dudes standing on the corner watching the girls pass by.Había unos tipos parados en la esquina mirando pasar a las chicas.
Who's that dude that's talking to your sister?¿Quién es ese tipo que está hablando con tu hermana?
b. el tío
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
He's a dude. He doesn't care about your feelings. - That's not true!Es un tío. Le dan igual tus sentimientos. - ¡Eso no es cierto!
c. el güey
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Mexico
(Mexico)
That dude is so loud.Ese güey es bien escandaloso.
d. el huevón
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Chile
(Chile)
Are you dating that dude?¿Estás pololeando con ese huevón?
e. el boludo
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Argentina
(Argentina)
I can't stand that dude.No me la banco a ese boludo.
f. el maje
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
Regionalism used in Central America: Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama
(Central America)
That dude owes me money.Ese maje me debe plata.
g. el mae
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Costa Rica
(Costa Rica)
That dude is really cool.Ese mae es bien tuanis.
2.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(form of address)
Regionalism used in the United States
(United States)
a. el amigo
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
How's it going, dude?¿Cómo te va, amigo?
b. el mano
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Latin America: all the countries in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Does not include Spain.
(Latin America)
What's happening, dude?¿Qué es la que hay, mano?
c. el tío
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
What's up, dude?¿Qué hay, tío?
d. el güey
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Mexico
(Mexico)
What's up, dude? - Just chilling.¿Qué pex, güey? - Aquí nomás.
e. el huevón
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Chile
(Chile)
Dude, who's that chick?Huevón, ¿quién es esa mina?
f. el boludo
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Argentina
(Argentina)
Come on, dude!¡Ponte las pilas, boludo!
g. el mae
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Costa Rica
(Costa Rica)
What's up, dude? Doing great or doing crappy?¿Qué tal, mae? ¿Tuanis o morado?
h. el asere
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Cuba
(Cuba)
What's up, dude?¿Qué bolá, asere?
i. el cerote
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A very informal word or phrase used by a particular group or community as a substitute for standard language (e.g. joint, john).
(slang)
Regionalism used in El Salvador
(El Salvador)
Regionalism used in Guatemala
(Guatemala)
Regionalism used in Honduras
(Honduras)
What's up, dude?¿Quiubo, cerote?
j. el parce
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(Andes)
What else is happening, dude?¿Y qué más, parce?
k. el maje
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Central America: Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama
(Central America)
What's up, dude?¿Ideay, maje?
l. el pata
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Peru
(Peru)
What's up, dude?¿Qué tal, pata?
3.
A word or phrase that is seldom used in contemporary language and is recognized as being from another decade, (e.g. cat, groovy).
(old-fashioned)
(dandy)
a. el petimetre
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
The dude entered the hall showing off his extravagant garb.El petimetre entró en el salón luciendo su extravagante atuendo.
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