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Quick answer
"Booger" is a noun which is often translated as "el moco", and "pig" is a noun which is often translated as "el cerdo". Learn more about the difference between "booger" and "pig" below.
booger(
boo
-
guhr
)
A noun is a word referring to a person, animal, place, thing, feeling or idea (e.g. man, dog, house).
1.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(dried mucus)
Regionalism used in the United States
(United States)
a. el moco
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
Don't pick your boogers! Use a handkerchief.¡No te saques los mocos con el dedo! Usa un pañuelo.
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pig(
pihg
)
A noun is a word referring to a person, animal, place, thing, feeling or idea (e.g. man, dog, house).
1. (animal)
a. el cerdo
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
, la cerda
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
The children saw some pigs when we visited the farm.Los niños vieron unos cerdos cuando visitamos la granja.
b. el puerco
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
, la puerca
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
Regionalism used in Latin America: all the countries in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Does not include Spain.
(Latin America)
They had the muddiest pig at the fair.Tenían el puerco más enfangado de la feria.
c. el chancho
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
, la chancha
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
Regionalism used in Latin America: all the countries in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Does not include Spain.
(Latin America)
The farmer took his pigs to the market.El granjero llevó sus chanchos al mercado.
2.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(greedy person)
a. el comilón
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
, la comilona
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
He was a pig at the banquet.Fue un comilón en el banquete.
b. el comelón
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
, la comelona
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in the Caribbean: Cuba, the Dominican Republic, and Puerto Rico
(Caribbean)
Regionalism used in Central America: Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama
(Central America)
Don't eat so fast, you pig!¡No comas tan rápido, comelón!
3.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(dirty person)
a. el cerdo
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
, la cerda
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
John is a real pig; he only showers on Saturdays.Juan es un cerdo; solo se ducha los sábados.
b. el chancho
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
, la chancha
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Latin America: all the countries in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Does not include Spain.
(Latin America)
What a pig Jack is; he always smells of sweat.Qué chancho es Jack; siempre huele a sudor.
4.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(unpleasant person)
a. el cerdo
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
, la cerda
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Your sister is a rotten pig! She ran off with my diary and threw it in the canal.¡Tu hermana es una cerda maldita! Se llevó mi diario y lo tiró en el canal.
5.
An offensive word or phrase used to degrade a person or group of people based on race, gender, sexual preference, etc. (e.g. ghetto).
(pejorative)
A very informal word or phrase used by a particular group or community as a substitute for standard language (e.g. joint, john).
(slang)
(police officer)
a. el poli
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
, la poli
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Three pigs were waiting for me when I left the store.Tres polis me esperaban cuando salí de la tienda.
b. el paco
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
, la paca
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Central America: Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama
(Central America)
Regionalism used in South America: Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, and Venezuela
(South America)
Martin's father is a police officer; I won't have you saying he's a pig.El padre de Martin es policía; no permito que digas que es paco.
c. el cana
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
, la cana
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(Southern Cone)
Quick, hide! There's a pig outside.¡Escóndete rápido! Hay un cana fuera.
d. el madero
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A very informal word or phrase used by a particular group or community as a substitute for standard language (e.g. joint, john).
(slang)
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
What did the pig say to you when he stopped you?Qué te dijo el madero cuando te detuvo?
pigs
A plural noun indicates that there is more than one person, place, thing, or idea.
plural noun
6.
An offensive word or phrase used to degrade a person or group of people based on race, gender, sexual preference, etc. (e.g. ghetto).
(pejorative)
A very informal word or phrase used by a particular group or community as a substitute for standard language (e.g. joint, john).
(slang)
(the police)
a. la poli
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
We need to get out of here! The pigs are coming.¡Tenemos que salir de aquí! Viene la poli.
b. la cana
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(Southern Cone)
Someone must have called the pigs.Alguien ha debido de avisar a la cana.
c. la pasma
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
I can't believe Juanito has joined the pigs.No llego a creer que Juanito se haya alistado en la pasma.
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