"calmaraste"

0
votes

My friends from Spain and ecuador keep writing this on each others facebooks and laughing. I was curious what adding "aste" after the infinitive does to the word? If this is like a common thing. It's obvious it's not like a totally normal thing to say, otherwise they wouldn't keep finding it so funny, but when I try to look it up it just brings me to "calmar" which is kind of right, but not really what they're going for I don't think.

I'd give you more context, but all they write it:

"Calmaraste!!! ajajajajaa!" and then other people click the little 'i like it!" button...

2744 views
updated JUL 19, 2009
posted by redsoxnia

7 Answers

0
votes

The humor may be in the fact that they are purposely mangling the verb to be funny.

If you look at the verb's conjugations, there is no correct form, calmaraste.

http://www.spanishdict.com/conjugate/calmar

I think that they are indeed, saying, "Take it easy", but purposely misspelling it.

Perhaps someone used it previously and they are ridiculing his use of the word.

I don't think so. It is just slang. Most of the time the roots of slang are unknown and I don't think that this case is any different.

Robert must know; he lives in Ecuador.

Before he confirmed that it was slang, I had thought of the possibility that qfreed mentioned, and also that maybe it came from a movie or something, and had caught on as slang with whatever meaning it had in the movie.

Here's a thought ... if it is a slang command meaning "Take it easy," maybe it is a play on "¡Te calmarás!", moving the pronoun to the end.

Maybe the humor is in the fact that young people many times will tell someone "Behave yourself," sarcastically and ironically encouraging them to do the opposite (i.e., don't "take it easy," but rather "Party!!").

updated JUL 19, 2009
posted by hhmdirocco
0
votes

My friends from Spain and ecuador keep writing this on each others facebooks and laughing. I was curious what adding "aste" after the infinitive does to the word?

The only standard (ie. not slang, not regional) use for "-ste" in Spanish is for the preterite (past tense), but this is not applied to the infinitive, but to the stem of the verb.

Calmaste = you calmed (down)

"Calmaraste", following this pattern, would be the past tense of the verb "calmarar", which doesn't exists, as far as I know. To me, it sounds like a made up word for a joke, or a slang.

updated JUL 19, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

The humor may be in the fact that they are purposely mangling the verb to be funny.

If you look at the verb's conjugations, there is no correct form, calmaraste.

http://www.spanishdict.com/conjugate/calmar

I think that they are indeed, saying, "Take it easy", but purposely misspelling it.

Perhaps someone used it previously and they are ridiculing his use of the word.

I don't think so. It is just slang. Most of the time the roots of slang are unknown and I don't think that this case is any different.

updated JUL 17, 2009
posted by Robert-Austin
0
votes

The humor may be in the fact that they are purposely mangling the verb to be funny.

If you look at the verb's conjugations, there is no correct form, calmaraste.
http://www.spanishdict.com/conjugate/calmar

I think that they are indeed, saying, "Take it easy", but purposely misspelling it.
Perhaps someone used it previously and they are ridiculing his use of the word.

updated JUL 17, 2009
posted by 0074b507
0
votes

It means "take it easy".

updated JUL 17, 2009
posted by Robert-Austin
0
votes

My friends from Spain and ecuador keep writing this on each others facebooks and laughing. I was curious what adding "aste" after the infinitive does to the word? If this is like a common thing. It's obvious it's not like a totally normal thing to say, otherwise they wouldn't keep finding it so funny, but when I try to look it up it just brings me to "calmar" which is kind of right, but not really what they're going for I don't think.

I'd give you more context, but all they write it:

"Calmaraste!!! ajajajajaa!" and then other people click the little 'i like it!" button...

It doesn't make any sense. Calmar is a verb meaning to calm. aste is the preterit tu form for an -AR verb. Are they writing anything other than that?

no, that's what I mean. I was wondering if there was some sort of informal thing where if you add 'aste' on the end of infintives it gives it a different meaning type thing...

I know this isn't like a dictionary word, but i thought maybe somebody would know what the meaning behind it is anyways.

updated JUL 17, 2009
posted by redsoxnia
0
votes

My friends from Spain and ecuador keep writing this on each others facebooks and laughing. I was curious what adding "aste" after the infinitive does to the word? If this is like a common thing. It's obvious it's not like a totally normal thing to say, otherwise they wouldn't keep finding it so funny, but when I try to look it up it just brings me to "calmar" which is kind of right, but not really what they're going for I don't think.

I'd give you more context, but all they write it:

"Calmaraste!!! ajajajajaa!" and then other people click the little 'i like it!" button...

It doesn't make any sense. Calmar is a verb meaning to calm. aste is the preterit tu form for an -AR verb. Are they writing anything other than that'

updated JUL 17, 2009
posted by Nathaniel