Traer vs. Llevar (again)

2
votes

I looked this up in the forum, but I'm still having trouble knowing when to use the word "traigo" instead of "llevo."

Lazaruz says:
*
Traer = bring something to the place where the speaker is when using the verb.
Llevar = take something to any other place.*

However, if I'm the speaker I can't bring something to myself. Can anyone give me examples of when to use "traigo'"

Thanks in advance.

21548 views
updated AGO 25, 2014
posted by --Mariana--

21 Answers

1
vote

TEN un buen dia. Tener is irregular in the tu command form as "ten." The usted command would be "tenga." just an fyi smile

Is this Spanish'?

I was taught "Que pases un buen día," or "Que le pase un buen día." That was in South America, where an American I was with always said "Ten/tengas un buen día," and nobody understood it. So I asked a native, and I was told that "Ten un buen día" did not make sense in Spanish, that it gave the idea of "take" a good day, which nobody understood.

Maybe this is not the same everywhere. Could some others comment on this'

updated JUL 21, 2012
posted by hhmdirocco
0
votes

I don´t think I´ve ever used "traer" outside of learning it in Spanish class. I have always used llevar, because to me it always sounded right. But I could be wrong.

updated MAY 3, 2012
posted by missy8888
0
votes

P.S. "Ten un buen día" sounds very odd to me too. I am not sure, but... quizás lo digan así en Madrid. hehe LOL

jeje, ya empezamos LOL

Bueno, odd it does sound odd, but I cannot see anything wrong with it.

Ten un buen día...sounds like you are giving somebody the order to have a nice day, jeje, but I cannot see a mistake here.

It would be highly unusual, right.

Your suggestions are used in Madrid too, even by Real Madrid fans. raspberry jeje

Actually, I have the same problem with the English "Have a nice day." To me, it sounds very much like a command. I keep thinking, What if I don't have a nice day? Is someone going to punish me (beat me up) because I failed to follow his instructions? Will I be forgiven, if I explain that I really tried to have a nice day but was unsuccessful?

I don't think it is given as a command in English, although I have heard others make the same comment you have. It is given as a wish, with the "I hope you" left off, as you pointed out is done is Spanish with "Espero."

The same could be said of other wishes given in this form: "Good night; sleep tight," or "Be safe/careful."

I have heard the entire wish given in both languages when someone is trying to emphasize their wish or to make it sound more sincere.
"I hope you have a nice day."
"Espero que pases un día muy lindo."

I have also heard both of these used sarcastically, where the opposite was actually meant.

updated JUL 16, 2009
posted by hhmdirocco
0
votes

P.S. "Ten un buen día" sounds very odd to me too. I am not sure, but... quizás lo digan así en Madrid. hehe LOL

jeje, ya empezamos LOL

Bueno, odd it does sound odd, but I cannot see anything wrong with it.

Ten un buen día...sounds like you are giving somebody the order to have a nice day, jeje, but I cannot see a mistake here.

It would be highly unusual, right.

Your suggestions are used in Madrid too, even by Real Madrid fans. raspberry jeje
Actually, I have the same problem with the English "Have a nice day." To me, it sounds very much like a command. I keep thinking, What if I don't have a nice day? Is someone going to punish me (beat me up) because I failed to follow his instructions? Will I be forgiven, if I explain that I really tried to have a nice day but was unsuccessful'

updated JUL 16, 2009
posted by samdie
0
votes

P.S. "Ten un buen día" sounds very odd to me too. I am not sure, but... quizás lo digan así en Madrid. hehe LOL

jeje, ya empezamos LOL

Bueno, odd it does sound odd, but I cannot see anything wrong with it.

Ten un buen día...sounds like you are giving somebody the order to have a nice day, jeje, but I cannot see a mistake here.

It would be highly unusual, right.

Your suggestions are used in Madrid too, even by Real Madrid fans. raspberry jeje

updated JUL 16, 2009
posted by 00494d19
0
votes

This is actually very interesting... and I'm glad to learn something new to help me with my spanish smile

What is the reasoning behind this format? Or is it just one of those things that are "just because'"
'que tengas un buen dia? is a (slightly) abbreviated version of 'Espero que tengas un buen dia.? (Leaving off the "espero" is common in casual conversation.) It translates in a very straightforward manner into English: "I hope that you (will) have a good day."

updated JUL 16, 2009
posted by samdie
0
votes

This is actually very interesting... and I'm glad to learn something new to help me with my spanish smile

What is the reasoning behind this format? Or is it just one of those things that are "just because'"

Hi britty, I like your suggestion, Or is it just one of those things that are "just because" ¿O es (esto) exactamente una de aquellas cosas que son así "porque sí"?

The most common ways to say "Have a nice day!" are,

"Que tengas un buen día" (informal) and 'Que tenga un buen día? (formal).
"Que pases un buen día? (informal) and 'Que pase un buen día? (formal).

P.S. "Ten un buen día" sounds very odd to me too. I am not sure, but... quizás lo digan así en Madrid. hehe LOL

updated JUL 16, 2009
posted by iker
0
votes

This is actually very interesting... and I'm glad to learn something new to help me with my spanish smile
What is the reasoning behind this format? Or is it just one of those things that are "just because'"

updated JUL 16, 2009
posted by carmen101
0
votes

I've been taught to say "que tengas un buen dia" (informal) and "que tenga un buen dia" (formal).

updated JUL 16, 2009
posted by --Mariana--
0
votes

"Ten/tengas un buen día," and nobody understood it. So I asked a native, and I was told that "Ten un buen día" did not make sense in Spanish, that it gave the idea of "take" a good day, which nobody understood.

Maybe this is not the same everywhere. Could some others comment on this'Soemtimes we seem to speak a different lenguage, jeje.

ten un buen día is unusual but correct. que tengas un buen día is what we would more often say.

Que le pase un buen día...what is the le referring to? I would consider this incorrect.

Que pase un buen día is another option.

I'm not going to lie to you Heidita, it sounded strange to me. Ten un buen dia. But because I don't know much and I'm trying to learn I took it for what the comment was worth. Thanks for the help with that phrase!! smile

updated JUL 16, 2009
posted by Jason7R
0
votes

"Ten/tengas un buen día," and nobody understood it. So I asked a native, and I was told that "Ten un buen día" did not make sense in Spanish, that it gave the idea of "take" a good day, which nobody understood.

Maybe this is not the same everywhere. Could some others comment on this'Soemtimes we seem to speak a different lenguage, jeje.

ten un buen día is unusual but correct. que tengas un buen día is what we would more often say.

Que le pase un buen día...what is the le referring to? I would consider this incorrect.

Que pase un buen día is another option.

updated JUL 15, 2009
posted by 00494d19
0
votes

TEN un buen dia. Tener is irregular in the tu command form as "ten." The usted command would be "tenga." just an fyi smile

Gracias por tu ayuda. Ten un buen dia!!

updated JUL 15, 2009
posted by Jason7R
0
votes

There was a thread the other day...

Does Marianne or someone else remember it, and can you find it?

I didn't see that one and I couldn't find much in a search. Odd that there aren't many examples of when we use the word "traigo."

Thanks everyone for your responses!

updated JUL 15, 2009
posted by --Mariana--
0
votes

TEN un buen dia. Tener is irregular in the tu command form as "ten." The usted command would be "tenga." just an fyi smile

updated JUL 15, 2009
posted by carmen101
0
votes

Gracias Nathaniel! Tiene un buen dia!

updated JUL 15, 2009
posted by Jason7R