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Tú/Tu tocar en la nariz ...

0
votes

"Tú/Tu tocar en la nariz, no va a salir sangre."

Not sure which it is (Tú/Tu). Is this correct Spanish?

Context:

"No la pegué; sólo le toqué la nariz."

"Tú/Tu tocar en la nariz, no va a salir sangre."

Is this the way to say, "You/Your touching her nose / Your touch on her nose, will not cause it to bleed"'

5467 views
updated JUL 13, 2009
posted by hhmdirocco

6 Answers

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You're right: I just saw the sentence, it didn't sound right and I jumped in. Now that I've read the whole thing grin I'd come up with a different suggestion, but I still think that that doesn't sound Spanish. I guess that the guy who said that uses English frequently, and that's why he inserted such a thing in the sentence.

updated JUL 13, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
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Sorry, it isn't my attempt. I am trying to decipher this same guy's "Spanish"; I just put down what he says and try to get the closest English equivalent. As you have seen, many times he doesn't give me much to work with.

Your English version of what he is saying is certainly the closest, no doubt.

In the Spanish version, have a look if may be le is missing or not very well heard.

(Con) tu tocarle en la nariz no le va a salir sangre.

I mean, he should have said: Si solo le has tocado la nariz no le iba a sangrar.(no le hubiera sangrado)But that is not the point here.

updated JUL 13, 2009
posted by 00494d19
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Por mucho que te toques la nariz, no te va a sangar.

Aunque [del]que[/del] te toques la nariz, no te va a sangar.

These sound like Spanish to me; your attempt doesn't.

But this has nothing to do with what the guy was saying. He is not touching *his own *nose but saying that if the other guy had only touched the woman's nose it would not have bled. So he must have hit her.

Creo que se te ha ido la mano con el "que".

updated JUL 13, 2009
posted by 00494d19
0
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"No le pegué; sólo le toqué la nariz."

That's a laísmo. "No la pegué" means "I didn't glue her". The correct sentence is "No le pegué (un golpe/una patada/un bofetón/un puñetazo/...), where the way she was hit is the direct object, which it is often omitted, and the person who receives the "hit" is the indirect object, and therefore, "le".

I have been wanting to ask this question since you answered the other day about DO pronouns always being lo/la, and IO pronouns being le/les, because I hear/see this verb pegar used all the time, meaning "to hit," with le apparently referring to the DO. Now that explains it! This is a gem to have discovered! Do you have one of your famous lists of verbs like this that the DO is many/most times omitted and the apparent DO is really the IO? That would be even better! Seriously.

"Tú/Tu tocar en la nariz, no va a salir sangre."

Is this the way to say, "You/Your touching her nose / Your touch on her nose, will not cause it to bleed"?

If you really want to say that, it should be "tu", without accent, but that sentence sounds completely weird and alien, if you ask me. English can generate nouns out of gerunds with practically every verb and idea conceivable, but in Spanish we are more limited in the range of ideas that we express with infinitives: instead, we use different constructions every time. I'd say something like:

Por mucho que te toques la nariz, no te va a sangar.

Aunque que te toques la nariz, no te va a sangar.

These sound like Spanish to me; your attempt doesn't.

Sorry, it isn't my attempt. I am trying to decipher this same guy's "Spanish"; I just put down what he says and try to get the closest English equivalent. As you have seen, many times he doesn't give me much to work with.

So to clarify on your answer ... are you saying that an acceptable way to make a noun out of most verbs is to use a possessive pronoun and the infinitive? Or are you saying that it is not acceptable, but that is what was done here? I think your answer got lost somewhere in the chiding.

updated JUL 13, 2009
posted by hhmdirocco
0
votes

"No le pegué; sólo le toqué la nariz."

That's a laísmo. "No la pegué" means "I didn't glue her". The correct sentence is "No le pegué (un golpe/una patada/un bofetón/un puñetazo/...), where the way she was hit is the direct object, which it is often omitted, and the person who receives the "hit" is the indirect object, and therefore, "le".

"Tú/Tu tocar en la nariz, no va a salir sangre."

Is this the way to say, "You/Your touching her nose / Your touch on her nose, will not cause it to bleed"?

If you really want to say that, it should be "tu", without accent, but that sentence sounds completely weird and alien, if you ask me. English can generate nouns out of gerunds with practically every verb and idea conceivable, but in Spanish we are more limited in the range of ideas that we express with infinitives: instead, we use different constructions every time. I'd say something like:

Por mucho que te toques la nariz, no te va a sangar.
Aunque que te toques la nariz, no te va a sangar.

These sound like Spanish to me; your attempt doesn't.

updated JUL 13, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

"No la pegué; sólo le toqué la nariz."

"Tú/Tu tocar en la nariz, no va a salir sangre."

Is this the way to say, "You/Your touching her nose / Your touch on her nose, will not cause it to bleed"?

He might be saying:

tu tocarle en la nariz no le va a hacer salir sangre.

Or even:

solo con tocarle en la nariz no le va a salir sangre.

Your translation, however, is the correct one.

updated JUL 13, 2009
posted by 00494d19
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