HomeQ&ALas gaisadas

Las gaisadas

0
votes

Martin Rizzi has Posted another of his Taxco/Guerrero folk music songs. You will find it here:
http://www.spanishdict.com/answers/show/9743/

At Line 8 the Spanish word 'gaisadas? is used. This word has me in a tizzy. I'm unable to find out what it means. In the song, Line 8 in Spanish and English is:

con sus torres en gaisadas

with its towers decorated

I checked the 2 dictionaries that SpanishDict.com uses and I did a search on the Real Academica Español. I had no better luck in WordReference.com. I also did an internet search using Google.

I got a lot of hits using google, but came away with a sense that today, gaisadas may find use in referring to gender/sexual orientation. I just don't understand how that usage could find its way into a description of the towers or spires of a cathedral.

Question: Is it possible the Spanish words were incorrectly transcribed from the song as it was performed?
You can listen to the song here:
http://www.artcamp.com.mx/Musica/Cuerdas/track07.mp3
I listened and thought it was performed as written but maybe I didn't listen well enough.

Question: This is a folk song written many years in history. Is this a word that has fallen into disuse in the way it is used in this old 'canción folklórico'. Even if the word is archaic, what does it (or did it) mean?

Question: Whoever translated it from Spanish to English has used 'decorated? as the English equivalent of 'gaisadas'. Do you know if this is correct? Whether you agree or not, can you refer me to any written evidence outside personal opinion in support of your claim?

Question: Does anyone have any guidance on the meaning of the word "gaisadas"

I sure do need some help here.

2294 views
updated JUL 5, 2009
posted by Moe

3 Answers

0
votes

ergarzar = assemble or string a necklace or other piece of jewelry

engsatar = to mount or set a stone in a piece of jewelry

Santa Prisca catedral
Santa Prisca cathedral

de filigranas muy finas
of very fine filigris

con sus torres engastadas
with its towers mounted

de canteras muy rosadas
with very pink facing stones

extraídas de sus minas.
extracted from her mines.

Regard any image of Sta. Prisca's interior

there must be many of these on the internet

the elaborate churriegesgo suggests filigri
which is a jewelry technique involving fine
soldering of compositions of network of wire.

everybody thanks! your contributions are not lost on me

updated JUL 5, 2009
posted by Martin-Rizzi
0
votes

My vote goes to "engarzado/a". The singer says he works silver and makes jewelry and the song is full of comparisons of the surrounding countryside to jewelry set with precious stones.

updated JUL 4, 2009
posted by samdie
0
votes

Martin Rizzi has Posted another of his Taxco/Guerrero folk music songs. You will find it here:

http://www.spanishdict.com/answers/show/9743/

At Line 8 the Spanish word 'gaisadas? is used. This word has me in a tizzy. I'm unable to find out what it means. In the song, Line 8 in Spanish and English is:

con sus torres en gaisadas

with its towers decorated

I checked the 2 dictionaries that SpanishDict.com uses and I did a search on the Real Academica Español. I had no better luck in WordReference.com. I also did an internet search using Google.

I got a lot of hits using google, but came away with a sense that today, gaisadas may find use in referring to gender/sexual orientation. I just don't understand how that usage could find its way into a description of the towers or spires of a cathedral.

Question: Is it possible the Spanish words were incorrectly transcribed from the song as it was performed?

You can listen to the song here:

http://www.artcamp.com.mx/Musica/Cuerdas/track07.mp3

I listened and thought it was performed as written but maybe I didn't listen well enough.

Question: This is a folk song written many years in history. Is this a word that has fallen into disuse in the way it is used in this old 'canción folklórico'. Even if the word is archaic, what does it (or did it) mean?

Question: Whoever translated it from Spanish to English has used 'decorated? as the English equivalent of 'gaisadas'. Do you know if this is correct? Whether you agree or not, can you refer me to any written evidence outside personal opinion in support of your claim?

Question: Does anyone have any guidance on the meaning of the word "gaisadas"

I sure do need some help here.

Moe, I heard the song and the transcription is accurate, It might be that the singer says 'engaisadas' and not 'en gaisadas'. Anyway, I didn't found results for 'engaisadas' either.

I think there are two options: 'engastadas' and 'engarzadas':

engastar v. tr. Encajar firmemente una cosa en un soporte o sobre una superficie, especialmente una perla o una piedra preciosa en una joya: engastar un zafiro en un anillo. engarzar.

http://es.thefreedictionary.com/engastada

Here some results in bing:

http://www.bing.com/search'q=engastada&go;=&form=QBLH&filt=all

And here the Magic Word entry:

http://www.wordmagicsoft.com/dictionary/es-en/engastado.php

Regards,

updated JUL 4, 2009
posted by Pablo_
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