what does this mean?

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Como que la cosa SI va estar buena de verdad

Thanks!

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updated JUL 4, 2009
posted by erin-Mitchell

8 Answers

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Another try: 'It looks like this thing IS really going to be good.'

'Como que' might be used in a conversation like this:

  • ¿Quieres ir al parque?

  • Como que no (I'm unsure, I think perhaps not)

Do you want to go to the park?

Perhaps not, I think I don't feel like it.

Now if there isn't such a conversation, and somebody starts a conversation saying, 'como que la cosa va a estar buena', it would be equivalent to 'parece que la cosa si se va a estar buena'; so 'It looks like' might be an option. I don't know if we can use only 'Like this thing...' as proposed.

All of these things are possibilities. The fact is, it is impossible to arrive at a precise translation without more context, or as you have hypothesized, the conversation to which this phrase or sentence (Which is it? It came with no punctuation.) belongs. Was this informal speech in a casual conversation, which acceptably involves incomplete sentences? Was this part of a sentence, excised for the purpose of making a shorter question? That is why I gave several possibilities, and your suggestions are also possibilities equally as valid.

updated JUL 4, 2009
posted by hhmdirocco
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Another try: 'It looks like this thing IS really going to be good.'

'Como que' might be used in a conversation like this:

  • ¿Quieres ir al parque?
  • Como que no (I'm unsure, I think perhaps not)

Do you want to go to the park?
Perhaps not, I think I don't feel like it.

Now if there isn't such conversation, and somebody start a conversation saying 'como que la cosa va a estar buena' it would be equivalent to 'parece que la cosa si se va a estar buena', so 'It looks like' might be an option. I don't know if we can use only 'Like this thing...' as proposed.

updated JUL 4, 2009
posted by Pablo_
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Como que la cosa SI va estar buena de verdad

That's funny! When "si" is clearly stressed, its meaning changes from "if" to "yes" (or an emphatic kind of "do", like here), and it is written with an accent. Instead of using the accent for this purpose, as it was intended, people resort to using capitals, quotation marks, or anything else, because they feel that without any special signal, people wouldn't know that the word has extra emphasis, which is what they wanted to write. These **are **the same people who later ask you "Why do you need those accents anyway'".

updated JUL 4, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
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¡Bienvenido al foro, Erin!

Como que la cosa sí va estar buena de verdad.

I am pretty sure that means "This thing is going to be really good"

That is just my guess,

Hope I helped

Regards, Eric

updated JUL 4, 2009
posted by eric_collins
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Como que la cosa va estar buena de verdad

Thanks!

To give a more precise translation, I would need more context, but it would be something like:

[Like/As if] [it/the thing/this thing] IS really going to be good

updated JUL 4, 2009
posted by hhmdirocco
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Good point. If I had seen the word here, I would have automatically known that it was stressed, even without the capitalization. The word si here (with no emphasis), meaning "if," would have rendered the phrase an incomplete thought.

updated JUL 4, 2009
posted by hhmdirocco
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Welcome to the forum, Erin.

Reading the forum rules will help you get the most out of this site. You can find them at http://www.spanishdict.com/answers/show/5328/.

Next time, include your text in your title.

Have fun and learn lots.

updated JUL 3, 2009
posted by hhmdirocco
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Como que la cosa SI va estar buena de verdad

Thanks!

Here my try: 'This thing is getting really good".

updated JUL 3, 2009
posted by Pablo_