HomeQ&ADía de Independencia

Día de Independencia

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July 4th is Independence Day in the United States. It is a celebration of when the United States formally declared independence from British rule. It is traditionally celebrated with cookouts, fireworks, sports (baseball in particular) and perhaps a rendition or two of the National Anthem.

I know that July 9th is Independence Day in Argentina, but I am not as familiar with customs and dates of independence in other parts of the world.

Is there an equivalent to Independence Day in countries such as England, Spain, and France, etc.?

El 4º de julio es el Día de Independencia en los Estados Unidos. Es un festejo de cuando los Estados Unidos formalmente declaró su independencia de la soberanía de Inglaterra. Tradicionalmente se fesetja el día con barbacoas, fuegos artificiales, deportes (especialmente el béisbol) y tal vez una rendición de la Canción Nacional.

Sé que en la Argentina el Día de Independencia es el 9 de julio, pero no estoy tan acostumbrado con los costumbres y fechas de independencia en otras partes del mundo.

¿Hay un equivalente a un Día de Independencia en otros países como Inglaterra, España y Francia, etc.'

5455 views
updated JUL 5, 2009
posted by Nathaniel

4 Answers

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It seems to me that The U.S.A. was born out of "revolution". Colonial Americans went to war to become an independent nation. As I understand it, 1776 is seen as the bloodshed year.

Canada, U.S.A.'s northern neighbour, stayed as a part of the British Empire until Canada's fathers of confederation acting with Britain's parliament caused Canada to "evolve" into an independent nation. 1867 is usually seen as the watershed year. A coming of age without bloodshed. So we say Canada was born out of "evolution".

We celebrate "Canada Day" on July 1st each year. This is done "on the day" and the holiday is not moved to the nearest weekend. Some of our statutory holidays are celebrated on a nearby weekend, but this is not so with Canada Day.

Canadians paused to celebrate our proud heritage yesterday, Wednesday, July 1, 2009.

I believe Canada and Canadians everywhere send their very best wishes to our American neighbours as they celebrate their 4th of July homage to their homeland.

Thank you, Moe, on behalf of all my American countrymen! We Americans share the same sentiments of appreciation and friendship toward our neighbors to the north!

Like Canada Day, Independence Day (July 4) is one of our holidays that we do not move to the weekend or celebrate on a Monday by statute. In fact, many people refer to the holiday as "the Fourth of July" or "the fourth," so that would be strange if it were celebrated on a day other than the 4th.

That is an interesting analogy ... "revolution/evolution," "bloodshed/watershed." (I happen to prefer the term "War for Independence" to "Revolutionary War," but your analogy is nevertheless a good one.) Also, I wish to clarify your statement that "Colonial Americans went to war to become an independent nation." That they did, but not until attacked first at Lexington, Massachusetts, and that on April 19, 1775. The formal Declaration of Independence was drafted on July 4, 1776, but the bloodshed began in 1775, extending into your country in the latter part of that year.

One other point on a matter of opinion ... I doubt that what occurred without bloodshed in 1867 would have been possible had it not been for the bloodshed of 90 years previous, that of 1812, and the other resulting wars and political developments in Europe during that course of 90 years. In any case, we are delighted that our Canadian comrades are just as well an independent nation, and we are glad that you were able to achieve that without loss of life or limb.

In addition, we are eternally indebted to Great Britain for our rich heritage and language, and for her friendship during the last two centuries; and as well to France, Spain, and the Dutch Republic, without whose help and support the colonists probably would not have prevailed (unless further providentially aided) in the War for Independence.

To Moe, and all our Canadian friends: a late but heartfelt "Happy Canada Day!" ¡Viva Canadá!

updated JUL 5, 2009
posted by hhmdirocco
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http://www.youtube.com/watch'v=nrLOw863pro

Independence Day in Mexico

updated JUL 5, 2009
posted by Martin-Rizzi
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¡Me gusta el cuarto de julio! I had fun shooting off fireworks. grin

updated JUL 5, 2009
posted by eric_collins
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It seems to me that The U.S.A. was born out of "revolution". Colonial Americans went to war to become an independant nation. As I understand it, 1776 is seen as the bloodshed year.

Canada, U.S.A.'s northern neighbour, stayed as a part of the British Empire until Canada's fathers of confederation acting with Britain's parliament caused Canada to "evolve" into an independant nation. 1867 is usually seen as the watershed year. A coming of age without bloodshed. So we say Canada was born out of "evolution".

We celebrate "Canada Day" on July 1st each year. This is done "on the day" and the holiday is not moved to the nearest weekend. Some of our statutory holidays are celebrated on a nearby weekend, but this is not so with Canada Day.

Canadians paused to celebrate our proud heritage yesterday, Wednesday, July 1, 2009.

I believe Canada and Canadians everywhere send their very best wishes to our American neighbours as they celebrate their 4th of July homage to their homeland.

updated JUL 2, 2009
posted by Moe
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