HomeQ&Adeja que

deja que

0
votes

I am reading and translating through a children's book in Spanish, and have this sentance (Viento, the wind, is a main character in the story)

Al principio, Viento es gentil y deja que mi globo flote en el aire.

When looking up dejar, it means to leave. Can someone explain why deja que becomes "let"? I must not be to that lesson yet that explains all the detail of using "que". smile

The next sentence says:
**
Pero, de repente, tira de él y se lo lleva hasta la copa de un árbol.**

I translate it as "But, suddenly, he pulls it and carries(') it to the top of the tree. I don't understand "se lo lleva".

9037 views
updated JUL 1, 2009
posted by Tonya25

8 Answers

3
votes

Yes, Viento is the main character. The title of the book is "Gilberto y el Viento".

In the first sentence then, what is "que" for?

Spanish uses conjunctions where English can omit them or doesn't use them at all. For example, in Spanish, in a sentence like "I know (that) you came", you simply cannot omit "que" (=that).

With "dejar" you can introduce a subordinate saying what are you letting anyone or anything do. This subordinate is an infinitive if it is clear who or what is the subject of the subordinate, but otherwise, you must use a fully finite verb, and these are always introduced by a conjunction or pronoun (most of the time, "que").

Dejale venir ("le" means "him", so he is the one who is coming)
Deja venir ''''? (who is coming? It makes no sense)
Dejar que venga tu hermano (here, your brother is the one who may be coming)

Can you explain why "se" (or "me") is sometimes attached to the end of some words? and other times in before a word?

Some "se" are actually part of the verb, pretty much like in "give up" is not an "up" attached to the verb "to give". When the verb is in imperative, some pronouns are always attached to it, and with infinitives and a present participles is the same, but if they go along with another verb, these pronouns can optionally appear before both verbs.

updated AGO 29, 2012
posted by lazarus1907
2
votes

(Viento, the wind, is a main character in the story)

It must be, because it is written with capitals, and without an article. For normal wind, it would have been "Al principio, el viento..."

When looking up dejar, it means to leave. Can someone explain why deja que becomes "let"? I must not be to that lesson yet that explains all the detail of using "que". smile

"Dejar" has many meanings, but a common one is "allow = let = permit".

Pero, de repente, tira de él y se lo lleva hasta la copa de un árbol.[/color]

I translate it as "But, suddenly, he pulls him and carries him it to the top of the tree. I don't understand "se lo lleva".

"Llevar" means "to carry/take". "Llevarse" means "to take away". The "lo" in between is "him" again.

updated AGO 22, 2012
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

Oh wow, thanks for the great help. Unfortunately I must not have paid much attention during grammar lessons in school (call me a math geek instead), because all those big grammar words are flying right over my head. I can't ignore this anymore. So I have grabbed my notebook and will now take a detour from my regular Spanish lessons so that I can dive into all those wonderful reference pages on this site. If I don't surface in a week, please send out a rescue team. LOL!

A search party has been organised for 08 July 2009.

updated JUL 1, 2009
posted by Eddy
0
votes

Good for you Tonya. I've learned lots of Spanish here too.

updated JUL 1, 2009
posted by patch
0
votes

Oh cool, I just noticed I am not a newbie anymore, but a Jr. Member. Though I know for a fact that I am very much still a newbie. jejeje!!

updated JUL 1, 2009
posted by Tonya25
0
votes

Oh wow, thanks for the great help. Unfortunately I must not have paid much attention during grammar lessons in school (call me a math geek instead), because all those big grammar words are flying right over my head. I can't ignore this anymore. So I have grabbed my notebook and will now take a detour from my regular Spanish lessons so that I can dive into all those wonderful reference pages on this site. If I don't surface in a week, please send out a rescue team. LOL!

updated JUL 1, 2009
posted by Tonya25
0
votes

Yes, Viento is the main character. The title of the book is "Gilberto y el Viento".

In the first sentence then, what is "que" for?

Can you explain why "se" (or "me") is sometimes attached to the end of some words? and other times in before a word'

updated JUL 1, 2009
posted by Tonya25
0
votes

and I only know that deja que is "let" because I typed it in the translator.

updated JUL 1, 2009
posted by Tonya25
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