HomeQ&APuedemos hablamos consigo

Puedemos hablamos consigo

0
votes

Can we speak with them? Please review and correct. Thank you all grin

6757 views
updated JUL 2, 2009
posted by Wannalearn

10 Answers

0
votes

Is this helpful? Don't hesitate to ask if it is not clear enough.

Tu explicación es más claro que el agua, como siempre, jeje.

updated JUL 2, 2009
posted by Eddy
0
votes

cannot grasp this subordinate clause and I take it, the verb esperar is the subordinate or subservient in your two cases .

"Esperar" is the regent verb, and "venir" is the subordinated one. See below.

In my answer with 'podamos? I can see my mistake. I related the ¿'.', marks, to mean 'es posible que? which in my mind is also a question and would have caused the subjunctive to be used. Why cannot poder be the subordinate if spoken with an interrogative tone and if not, why is it the main verb.

I also know how to use the J notation and calculate impedance, but not understanding this has nothing to do with being stupid, but with how much grammar you've studied before, and grammar has never been a key subject in this country.

Take a simple sentence with one verb:

Quiero algo.

"Algo" is a noun, and its function in the sentence is direct object. If we want to express more complex things, we can replace the noun with a nominal clause, with exactly the same function:

Quiero que vengas.

That phrase introduced with "que" is a subordinate, and now that we have one, the subjunctive kicks in. This "(que) vengas" is subordinated to "Quiero...", which is the main sentence within which "(que) vengas" has been inserted.

In your sentence, "poder" is an auxiliary verb, and needs to work together with another verb in infinitive to form a single verb group (periphrasis), but in any case, it is not "inserted" inside a bigger sentence, so forget about subjunctive altogether. Syntactically,

Como algo
Puedo comer algo

are practically the same, except for one sentence uses a simple verb (comer), and the other uses the same verb in a periphrasis (poder comer), which behaves exactly like a single verb would. "Algo" is the direct object in both cases. If you want to use subjunctive, replace that "algo" with a subordinate (ie. insert it in the main sentence), and then you may be able to justify subjunctive.

Subordinate clauses cannot function alone: they only make sense within a main sentence.

Is this helpful? Don't hesitate to ask if it is not clear enough.

updated JUL 2, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

Well, I thought the questions marks would have warranted the subjunctive but as Lazarus points out, they do not.

You can use the subjunctive perfectly in questions, but only if there is a subordinate clause within that question that you don't declare. Look:

Podemos hablar con ellos

The verb "poder" is the main verb, so it cannot be used in subjunctive: "Podamos hablar con ellos" would be plain wrong, and so it is the corresponding question. However, insert a subordinate in your question, and the usual subjunctive rule applies:

Esperan que vengas

¿Esperas que vengas?

Hi Lazarus
I don't want you think I am stupid when I am not. I cannot grasp this subordinate clause and I take it, the verb esperar is the subordinate or subservient in your two cases . Ask me to derive the solution of a quadratic equation from first principles and I can do it. Ask me to work out the resultant impedance of an inductive or a capacitive circuit using 'J? notation and I can do it, but this subordinate is giving me difficulty. In my answer with 'podamos? I can see my mistake. I related the ¿'.', marks, to mean 'es posible que? which in my mind is also a question and would have caused the subjunctive to be used. Why cannot poder be the subordinate if spoken with an interrogative tone and if not, why is it the main verb.

updated JUL 1, 2009
posted by Eddy
0
votes

Well, I thought the questions marks would have warranted the subjunctive but as Lazarus points out, they do not.

You can use the subjunctive perfectly in questions, but only if there is a subordinate clause within that question that you don't declare. Look:

Podemos hablar con ellos

The verb "poder" is the main verb, so it cannot be used in subjunctive: "Podamos hablar con ellos" would be plain wrong, and so it is the corresponding question. However, insert a subordinate in your question, and the usual subjunctive rule applies:

Esperan que vengas
¿Esperas que vengas'

updated JUN 30, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

Can we speak with them? Please review and correct. Thank you all grin

¿Podamos hablar con ellos?

Are you using the subjunctive here to mean "are we permitted" .vs. "are we (physically/not blocked by language...capable) able to talk to them"?

Well, I thought the questions marks would have warranted the subjunctive but as Lazarus points out, they do not.

updated JUN 30, 2009
posted by Eddy
0
votes

Thank you so much once again grin

updated JUN 30, 2009
posted by Wannalearn
0
votes

Thanks yet again Lazarus, for clearing up something I found confusing. smile

updated JUN 30, 2009
posted by Valerie
0
votes

¿Podemos hablar con ellos?

Subjunctive is not allowed here, no matter how much uncertainty you have. Subjunctive has to be subordinated to a main sentence, whether it is explicit or implicit.

updated JUN 30, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

Can we speak with them? Please review and correct. Thank you all grin

¿Podamos hablar con ellos?

Are you using the subjunctive here to mean "are we permitted" .vs. "are we (physically/not blocked by language...capable) able to talk to them"'

updated JUN 30, 2009
posted by 0074b507
0
votes

Can we speak with them? Please review and correct. Thank you all grin

¿Podamos hablar con ellos'

updated JUN 30, 2009
posted by Eddy
SpanishDict is the world's most popular Spanish-English dictionary, translation, and learning website.
© Curiosity Media Inc.