HomeQ&A"so" and "to (after a verb)" in spanish?

"so" and "to (after a verb)" in spanish?

0
votes

how can the word "so" be used in spanish, in phrases such as "so much" (e.g. I need to sleep so much/I love you so much). is there a direct translation?

also, in english the word "to" is commonly used after a verb, such as "I would love to", "I have to", "now, I don't need to". How can this be expressed in spanish?

Thanks smile

1823 views
updated MAY 9, 2012
posted by Regan

9 Answers

0
votes

how can the word "so" be used in spanish, in phrases such as "so much" (e.g. I need to sleep so much/I love you so much). is there a direct translation?

also, in english the word "to" is commonly used after a verb, such as "I would love to", "I have to", "now, I don't need to". How can this be expressed in spanish?

Thanks smile

I love you so much = Te quiero tanto
I like it so much = Me gusta tanto
Thank you so much = Muchísimas gracias

I would love to = Me gustaría
Now, I don't need to = Ahora, no necesito.
Do you have to study? Yes, I have to. = ¿Tienes que estudiar? Sí, si tengo.

updated MAY 9, 2012
posted by Pablo_
0
votes

Pablo's response reminds me of how we'd say the same thing in English:

Do you have to study?

Nope, don't have to.

The response is an incomplete, shortened sentence but it's what we say.

Marianne,

I don't know exactly why English teachers ask us not to give simple yes/no answers, or not'. Perhaps answers like 'Yes, I have to' are preferred because they are formal or polite? Could you please explain this please?

English Speakers tend to use that alot,

for example:

If you ask you English teacher is doing okay.......

Instead of geting all detailed, like "I'm in just a great mood"
she can just simply say "YES"

updated JUN 28, 2009
posted by eric_collins
0
votes

Thank you very much smile

updated JUN 28, 2009
posted by Pablo_
0
votes

Pablo's response reminds me of how we'd say the same thing in English:

Do you have to study?

Nope, don't have to.

The response is an incomplete, shortened sentence but it's what we say.

Marianne,

I don't know exactly why English teachers ask us not to give simple yes/no answers, or not'. Perhaps answers like 'Yes, I have to' are preferred because they are formal or polite? Could you please explain this please?
Because such exercise are directed at getting you to produce sentences in Spanish. a simple "yes"/"no" may suggest that you understand the question but does not involve your being able to reproduce a complete sentence that might/should be used in response. Obviously, it is essential that you understand the question but, in most cases, the point of the exercise is to provide situations in which you can/should use some sort of construction that is the substance of the lesson.

updated JUN 27, 2009
posted by samdie
0
votes

I don't know why, me being a native English speaker, that is just the way English works

updated JUN 27, 2009
posted by eric_collins
0
votes

Pablo's response reminds me of how we'd say the same thing in English:

Do you have to study?

Nope, don't have to.

The response is an incomplete, shortened sentence but it's what we say.

Marianne,

I don't know exactly why English teachers ask us not to give simple yes/no answers, or not'. Perhaps answers like 'Yes, I have to' are preferred because they are formal or polite? Could you please explain this please'

updated JUN 27, 2009
posted by Pablo_
0
votes

Do you have to study? Yes, I have to. = ¿Tienes que estudiar? Sí, sí tengo.

Sí tengo? Do you really say that, Pablo? The "agrammaticality" of these shortened sentences is what characterizes this type of periphrasis, according to all grammars. To me, it sounds extremely weird.

-¿Tenéis que ir?

-Sí tengo. ''''?

-No tengo. ''''?

-Lo que tengo es que irme. ''''''?

¿Qué es lo que tienen? ohh

Good point Lazarus. A better answer to the last question could be a simple 'Si/no' or for example, 'Si, debo hacerlo' or something else.

updated JUN 27, 2009
posted by Pablo_
0
votes

Pablo's response reminds me of how we'd say the same thing in English:

Do you have to study?
Nope, don't have to.

The response is an incomplete, shortened sentence but it's what we say.

updated JUN 27, 2009
posted by --Mariana--
0
votes

Do you have to study? Yes, I have to. = ¿Tienes que estudiar? Sí, sí tengo.

Sí tengo? Do you really say that, Pablo? The "agrammaticality" of these shortened sentences is what characterizes this type of periphrasis, according to all grammars. To me, it sounds extremely weird.

-¿Tenéis que ir?
-Sí tengo. ''''?
-No tengo. ''''?
-Lo que tengo es que irme. ''''''?

¿Qué es lo que tienen? ohh

updated JUN 27, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
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