HomeQ&A¿"es de" o "este"?

¿"es de" o "este"?

0
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El diccionario indica que la expresión 'es que ...? es para explicar, y se traduce 'the thing is that ...? o 'it's just that ...'. Pero muchas veces lo que escucho cuando uno no está decidido como expresarse, suena más como 'Es de, quería decirle que, es de, es de, el dinero que me dio, pues es de, lo perdí'. Me imagino que eso equivale en el inglés a 'Um, ... um ... um ...'.

Mi pregunta es, ¿Están diciendo 'es de? o 'este'?

Gracias

2009 views
updated JUN 23, 2009
posted by hhmdirocco

9 Answers

0
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... and "W. C." is English.

I have seen W. C. over bathroom entrances in South America. Hardly anyone I asked (just curious as to how they would answer) could tell me what it meant, besides saying that it was "los servicios" or "el baño," if they thought the gringo wouldn't understand "servicios."

Funny, one guy said it had something to do with "el wáter," and when I suggested "Quizás, ¿wáter clóset'", he responded, "Tal vez, wáter cómodo, muy cómodo." (I think he was wanting a "propina.")

updated JUN 23, 2009
posted by hhmdirocco
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Off topic somewhat: In English we borrow Latin abbreviations like i.e. , e.g. et. al., etc.)

Does Spanish use these Latin abbreviations or do they have there own?

Would i.e. (id est)=that is be used or would e.q. for es que be used (or something similar). The only one that I have noticed here is ej. (ejemplo) used for e.g. (exempli gratia), but I don't know if that's something someone made up. (it might be p.e. for por ejemplo)

We do use some Latin expressions, but until recently (ie. before the Internet), the standard abbreviation for "for example" was "p. ej." (por ejemplo), and the more posh "v.g." (verbi gratia), but not "e.g.". Now this Latin "exampli gratia" has become fashionable too in Spanish. Although "i. e." is recognized, I'd say that it is more common to write it in full: "es decir", "esto es", "o sea",... The Latin post-scriptum ("P. S.") is normally "P. D." (post data), but both are recognized.

"A.D." is "anno dominin", but "a. C." and "a. de C." is "antes de cristo". "Et ál" is the same, and "W. C." is English. There are not many more English ones that I can think of right now.

updated JUN 23, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
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Bingo! That was my question. Now I'm going to have to change my transcript in about 6,429 places! This guy (the accused) could not form a single sentence with out "esti, pues, no pu's, estiii ... p's ..."

But now I've got it right! Thanks to all, and especially again to ... who else? Heidita.

updated JUN 23, 2009
posted by hhmdirocco
0
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Here they mention the use especially in Mexico.

esteeeeeeee

updated JUN 23, 2009
posted by 00494d19
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rocco, they say : este....., ...

Very colloquial, not (frequently) used in Spain.

Look at this

I would use this translation.

this might come in handy too:

What to say while you're working out what to say (fillers):

Pues - well

bueno - well, now then, right then

hombre - well, I don't know, well!, hey!, really!

este - well, er

o sea - well...

mire/mira - look here

no sé - I don't know

¿Sabe/s? - you know?

Ways to say OK:

sí - yes

de acuerdo - okay, right, all right

vale - okay, all right

bien - very well, all right, okay

bueno - very well, all right, okay

conforme - okay, all right

tenere razón - to be right

eso es - that's right

efectivamente - indeed, exactly

cierto - of course, certainly

desde luego - of course, certainly

seguro - sure

claro - of course, obviously

estar de acuerdo - to agree, to be in agreement

>

updated JUN 23, 2009
posted by 00494d19
0
votes

Mi opinión. Podría ser... '¿Qué hicieste con el dinero que te dí', respuesta: 'Este....' (sin palabras o no quiere responder) ¿Me vas a decir', respuesta: 'Es que, ¡lo perdí!'.

I hope this helps.

Off topic somewhat: In English we borrow Latin abbreviations like i.e. , e.g. et. al., etc.)

Does Spanish use these Latin abbreviations or do they have there own?

Would i.e. (id est)=that is be used or would e.q. for es que be used (or something similar). The only one that I have noticed here is ej. (ejemplo) used for e.g. (exempli gratia), but I don't know if that's something someone made up. (it might be p.e. for por ejemplo)

That is, until Heidita used u.t.c.prnl. the other day. If she hadn't explained it, I would have thought that she was "chat speaking"" with us or sharing a SMS.

Back to your topic:

I think that in English we often use that is as a pause filler or um.

In this moment, I only remember p.e. (por ejemplo), or q.e.p.d. (que en paz descanse) when someone pass away or dies, or m.s.n.m. (metros sobre el nivel del mar), etc. but in the daily written text I only remember p.e.

updated JUN 23, 2009
posted by Pablo_
0
votes

Yes, I think that is what this is--a filler. Another one is "pues" and "pu's". There are some people who cannot utter one sentence without saying "pues" 5 - 10 times!

My challenge on this current project is to transcribe and then transalte every syllable uttered. That's why I was asking if it is "es de" or "este". Maybe there is somebody out there who knows about some codification of "filler talk."

Thanks Q

updated JUN 23, 2009
posted by hhmdirocco
0
votes

Mi opinión. Podría ser... '¿Qué hicieste con el dinero que te dí', respuesta: 'Este....' (sin palabras o no quiere responder) ¿Me vas a decir', respuesta: 'Es que, ¡lo perdí!'.

I hope this helps.

Off topic somewhat: In English we borrow Latin abbreviations like i.e. , e.g. et. al., etc.)
Does Spanish use these Latin abbreviations or do they have there own?
Would i.e. (id est)=that is be used or would e.q. for es que be used (or something similar). The only one that I have noticed here is ej. (ejemplo) used for e.g. (exempli gratia), but I don't know if that's something someone made up. (it might be p.e. for por ejemplo)
That is, until Heidita used u.t.c.prnl. the other day. If she hadn't explained it, I would have thought that she was "chat speaking"" with us or sharing a SMS.
Back to your topic:
I think that in English we often use that is as a pause filler or um.

updated JUN 23, 2009
posted by 0074b507
0
votes

Mi opinión. Podría ser... '¿Qué hicieste con el dinero que te dí', respuesta: 'Este....' (sin palabras o no quiere responder) ¿Me vas a decir', respuesta: 'Es que, ¡lo perdí!'.

I hope this helps.

updated JUN 23, 2009
posted by Pablo_
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