How do you say, "Sorry for missing you!"

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Can someone help me translate this into Spanish? I wanted to leave it as a message for someone who had sent me a message when I wasn't at the computer. Echar, faltar, perder- not sure which to use or if there is an entirely different verb that is better. Thanks much!

17345 views
updated SEP 22, 2010
posted by Linda-Kapusta

10 Answers

1
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If you're leaving that as a message on an answering machine, I would just say something like, "Perdona. No me encuentro en este momento." I don't think a literal translation would work in this case.

updated SEP 22, 2010
posted by LadyDi
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HI Linda and wicks, welcome to the forum.

Linda, missing in what sense?

I mean, miss can mean: Oh, you came to visit and I missed you, or, Oh, I am missing you so much as I love you.

The second meaning would be a bit strange here, but you might be heartbroken or something.

Well, first case:

Oh, lo siento no estaba en casa.

Second case:

Siento mucho echarte tanto de menos.

updated SEP 22, 2010
posted by 00494d19
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Maybe try: perdon, yo no estaba en la casa cuando me mandaste tu mensaje. (I was not in the house when you sent me your message).

updated SEP 22, 2010
posted by MrZeolite
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If you're leaving that as a message on an answering machine, I would just say something like, "Perdona. No me encuentro en este momento." I don't think a literal translation would work in this case.

I like this too, but the author seems to say "Sorry for being away" or "Sorry I was away." In this case, how about.

"Perdona por mi ausente"

"Perdona por yo no estaba"'

updated JUN 18, 2009
posted by duy
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Really? "Perdona. No me encuentro en este momento." How can one fail to find oneself? I'd have thought "encuentras" / "encuentra" / "encontró" / "encontraste".

Sam, my point too!! jejeje

this is very typically used by other countries not Spain and when you call a house often somebody tells you: La señora no se encuentra.
I even answered once, well, let's hope she finds herself in the end. LOL

But in Spanish: Espero que se encuentre al final. ....was not understood as ironic but as a perfectly normal sentence, jejeje
Many people of latin countries use "encontrarse" as "to be home"

updated JUN 17, 2009
posted by 00494d19
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I totally agree with LadyDi: it is pointless to try to stick that "missing you" in the Spanish sentence, because we don't speak like that in Spanish. LadiDi's complete rewrite is exactly what any Spaniard would have left in an answering machine if they were not trying to translate from English.
Really? "Perdona. No me encuentro en este momento." How can one fail to find oneself? I'd have thought "encuentras" / "encuentra" / "encontró" / "encontraste".

updated JUN 17, 2009
posted by samdie
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WEll, so far nobody mentioned the answering machine. But that is just another guess.

updated JUN 17, 2009
posted by 00494d19
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I totally agree with LadyDi: it is pointless to try to stick that "missing you" in the Spanish sentence, because we don't speak like that in Spanish. LadiDi's complete rewrite is exactly what any Spaniard would have left in an answering machine if they were not trying to translate from English.

updated JUN 17, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
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Lo siento por echo le menos. I'm sorry for missing you.

i hope that's on the right tract.
ewicks.

updated JUN 17, 2009
posted by e-wicks
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Siento no haberme podido contactar contigo.===Sorry to have missed contacting you?
Siento no haber estado presente===Sorry I couldn't be present?

Expressions to that effect may be used.

There is no direct translation that allows you to used the word "missing".

I'm sorry I missed seeing you the other day.
Siento no haberte visto el otro día.

updated JUN 17, 2009
posted by 00b83c38