HomeQ&Athe difference between jugo and zumo

the difference between jugo and zumo

1
vote

Hi what is the difference between

el jugo de naranja

and

el zumo de naranja?

Thanks.

61262 views
updated ENE 28, 2011
posted by amishera

8 Answers

2
votes

Growing up, I learned that there IS a subtle difference in meaning between 'jugo' and zumo', at least in Spain. While both words mean 'juice', zumo describes the liquid that is extracted by squeezing fruits or vegetables (as in zumo de naranga). In essence, when you cut open the fruit, zumo is what dribbles out! Jugo, on the other hand, is extracted by heating/cooking/boiling/ or processing (as is the case with sugar cane, meats, and beets!)

My steak is 'jugoso' (juicy), but I drink 'zumo de naranga'.

updated DIC 7, 2012
posted by Chester3
2
votes

No creo que exista mucha diferencia entre los dos. El jugo es la sustancia que se adquiere al exprimir las frutas y los vegetales, pero también se refiere a sustancias líquidas animales. Se puede decir: "El asado se quedó sin jugo." Zumo es más o menos lo mismo. "Nos están sacando el jugo en este trabajo." "Nos están sacando el zumo al máximo." Yo creo que es lo mismo, pero preferiría utilizar zumo para referirme a la esencia mas íntima de las cosas.

updated ENE 28, 2011
posted by 00b83c38
Very odd! When I click on your avatar I get "The user could not be found" - lagartijaverde, ENE 28, 2011
1
vote

Here, in Bolivia, Jugo is used when the fruit juice can be mixed with water or even milk. Zumo indicates that the drink asked for should be "pure fruit juice!.

updated ENE 28, 2011
posted by ian-hill
1
vote

Referring specifically to fruit juice (orange juice at al.), in my experience, "zumo" is the commonly used term in Spain and "jugo" in Latin America (although they certainly understood me in L.A. when I used "zumo").

updated ENE 28, 2011
posted by samdie
0
votes

Yes, they will both be understood, except that in some countries one is used more than the other or are used differently. Here at the states I haven't heard the word zumo in years. Sometimes a person will use zumo when he is trying to give a recipe for some home made concoction or remedy. They used the word zumo to make it sound more medicinal'le hechas el zumo de un limón bla bla bla'silly'

updated JUN 14, 2009
posted by 00b83c38
0
votes

Does that mean that either one will be understandable by both native spanish speakers in both spain and latin america?

PS: I am not a native spanish speaker. It would be great if explanations given only in english.

updated JUN 14, 2009
posted by amishera
0
votes

Both words are used differently in different countries. "Jugo" appears to be the oldest one, whereas "zumo" was borrowed by the Arabs centuries ago. Nila45's explanation is quite useful in Spain, but it doesn't apply to other countries where "jugo" is used where Spaniards would use "zumo". In practice, either one will be understood everywhere.

updated JUN 13, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

En España, podemos decir "dame un vaso de zumo de naranja", pero no podemos decir "dame un vaso de jugo de naranja". El jugo es más bien la sustancia.

"Tenía todo su jugo". "Tenía toda su sustancia". El jugo también se utiliza para el caldo, etc. Es refiriéndose a algún alimento líquido en cuanto a su densidad. Por ejemplo, puedo imaginarme un anuncio publicitario diciendo de un zumo. "Zumo XXX, con todo su jugo". Está refiriéndose a la densidad o a la cantidad que ese zumo tiene. Si tiene un 100%, 80%, 30% de zumo.

También puedo utilizar la palabra "jugo" refiriéndome a algún tipo de salsa. "Me gusta que la carne tenga algo de jugo". Es la sustancia espesa.

updated JUN 13, 2009
posted by nila45
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