HomeQ&Ahow can use "pronombres acusativos"in spanish''?

how can use "pronombres acusativos"in spanish''?

0
votes

For chinese learner,it is very hard to learn pronombres acusatvos in sentence.I always can't understand what it instead and how to use it especial when writng.how can i stuty it well'If i can't understand it i am not going to learn next step!
such as:
¿Dónde compran ustedes las comidas?
**Las **compramos en el mercado.
The two las instead the same '

6032 views
updated JUN 13, 2009
posted by kittymimi

13 Answers

0
votes

Comenzar and empezar they all mean start! but we don´t know in which setence should use comenzar and in which sentence we should use empezar.how can resolve this problem? Using spanish dictionary and then renmber the meaning?

Most of the time, they are synonyms, so you can use either. The only difference I can think of is when you use "empezar" to mean that you have began to east or drink something:

Usa este paquete de harina, que ya está empezado

Meaning that this bag of flour has already been opened and used. Here, you can't say "comenzado".

updated JUN 13, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

Yes,our language is a little hard,but the pronucation is easy for overseas. The writing is a little harder,because the writing not like a,b,c words!

The pronunciation is not too hard, but not easy either;, it is more complex than Spanish. The intonation, on the other h phoneticallyand, is quite difficult for learners who don't speak a tonal language. The writing system is one of the hardest in the planet. On the other hand, the grammar is one of the easiest.

More phonemes than Spanish and fewer than English. Tones are a strange problem (for non-native speakers). One issue is being able to hear/distinguish them and reproduce them. In my own case, I have found that I can hear and reproduce them when I'm doing as an exercise in minimal pairs, but five minutes later (or even two), I can't remember which tone corresponded to which meaning. I suppose this means, in other words, although I can hear tones, I can't remember them.

As to the (writing system) characters, a large number of them consist of a semantic component plus a phonetic component. This may be of some small help when learning but, for the most part, learning to read/write Chinese/Japanese is an exercise in "brute force" memorization (and visual memorization, at that).
Like spanish ,we also don´t know which word can espress the tone well.In chinese we call it similar words.That means they have the same meaning but while using it we must know the basic meaning of it,then can undestand them well!such as the two spanish words following
Comenzar and empezar they all mean start!but we don´t know in which setence should use comenzar and in which sentence we should use empezar.how can resolve this problem'Using spanish dictionary and then renmber the meaning'

updated JUN 13, 2009
posted by kittymimi
0
votes

In my own case, I have found that I can hear and reproduce them when I'm doing as an exercise in minimal pairs, but five minutes later (or even two), I can't remember which tone corresponded to which meaning. I suppose this means, in other words, although I can hear tones, I can't remember them.

That's exactly my problem! For short sentences (about 3 syllables), I can probably reproduce the tones and the pronunciation accurately enough to fool a Chinese, and I can differentiate the tones, but a few minutes later I can't remember the tones I used.

updated JUN 12, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

Yes,our language is a little hard,but the pronucation is easy for overseas. The writing is a little harder,because the writing not like a,b,c words!

The pronunciation is not too hard, but not easy either; phonetically, it is more complex than Spanish. The intonation, on the other hand, is quite difficult for learners who don't speak a tonal language. The writing system is one of the hardest in the planet. On the other hand, the grammar is one of the easiest.
More phonemes than Spanish and fewer than English. Tones are a strange problem (for non-native speakers). One issue is being able to hear/distinguish them and reproduce them. In my own case, I have found that I can hear and reproduce them when I'm doing as an exercise in minimal pairs, but five minutes later (or even two), I can't remember which tone corresponded to which meaning. I suppose this means, in other words, although I can hear tones, I can't remember them.

As to the (writing system) characters, a large number of them consist of a semantic component plus a phonetic component. This may be of some small help when learning but, for the most part, learning to read/write Chinese/Japanese is an exercise in "brute force" memorization (and visual memorization, at that).

updated JUN 12, 2009
posted by samdie
0
votes

Some traditional grammars (and some structuralists) regard articles as a sub-class of the adjectives, arguing that they modify nouns directly, like adjectives do, and they agree with the nouns too, so they talk about "adjetivos determinativos y calificativos".

However, most grammars agree on classifying them separately as determinants (or similar words). The argument goes as follows: first, they have no lexical meaning and they are a closed group, whereas new adjectives are created all the time, and they all have meaning. Quite often, their function is simply to indicate that something has been already mentioned, to specify, or they accompany the noun without any apparent logical reason. Adjectives classify, but determinants stablish references and actualize nouns. Adjectives can be used as predicates (e.g. Esto es azul), but determinants can't (Eso es la''').

updated JUN 12, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

The two las are different parts of speech.

las comidas...the las is a definite article or more generally an adjective '''' as it modifies the noun comidas.

Huh?

You don't agree? I've always thought that definite/indefinite articles were a subgroup of classifying or delimiting/ quantifying adjectives such as unos, cada, alguno, ninguno, mucho, etc.
I believe that's why they always classify nouns (gerunds) and also why they precede nouns. However, I don't smoke either, but my mind has been known to take small "trips". I'm searching for an authority. So far I've only found phrases that hint to their status like this one:

Like most adjectives, the definite article in Spanish varies with number and gender:

I'll keep looking until I find out , one way or the other. It won't be the first nor the last time that I was "out there".

I stand corrected. I clipped this from a Wikipedia article:

Articles are traditionally considered to form a separate part of speech. Linguists place them in the class of determiners.

So I guess that I should take up "smoking", if you're going to get the effect, you may as well enjoy the cause.

I may have to re-think my apology. Read this article on the 8 parts of [English] speech. Click on adjective part of speech (table) and look for determiners.

Now, I may have to go with it depends on who you ask whether the definite and indefinte articles are a subgroup of adjectives or not.

updated JUN 12, 2009
posted by 0074b507
0
votes

las comidas...the las is a definite article or more generally an adjective as it modifies the noun comidas.

Ahora es tu vez de decirnos qué cosa es esa que vas fumando por ahí smile

Hola Heitor: Así lo diríamos por aquí. No sé si tu forma se puede decir en otros lares.

Por lo demás, que se explique Quentin, LOL

updated JUN 12, 2009
posted by 00494d19
0
votes

Yes,our language is a little hard,but the pronucation is easy for overseas. The writing is a little harder,because the writing not like a,b,c words!

The pronunciation is not too hard, but not easy either; phonetically, it is more complex than Spanish. The intonation, on the other hand, is quite difficult for learners who don't speak a tonal language. The writing system is one of the hardest in the planet. On the other hand, the grammar is one of the easiest.

updated JUN 12, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

las comidas...the las is a definite article or more generally an adjective as it modifies the noun comidas.

Ahora es tu vez de decirnos qué cosa es esa que andas a fumar smile

updated JUN 12, 2009
posted by 00719c95
0
votes

The two las are different parts of speech.

las comidas...the las is a definite article or more generally an adjective '''' as it modifies the noun comidas.

Huh?

The two las instead the same ?

Kitty, did you mean: Do the two las mean the same?

I am sure it is very difficult for a Chinese to learn Spanish. However, it must be muuuuuch more difficult to learn your language.

anything you need to ask, Kitty, feel free to do so smile
Thanks Heidita .
I am not understand the "pronombres acusativos" of spanish.
qfreed give me detail explain of that sentence,and i studied the website he give to me.Understand a little,i think it need a long time for it!
Yes,our language is a little hard,but the pronucation is easy for overseas .The writing is a little harder,because the writing not like a,b,c words!

updated JUN 12, 2009
posted by kittymimi
0
votes

The two las are different parts of speech.

las comidas...the las is a definite article or more generally an adjective '''' as it modifies the noun comidas.

Huh?

The two las instead the same ?

Kitty, did you mean: Do the two las mean the same?

I am sure it is very difficult for a Chinese to learn Spanish. However, it must be muuuuuch more difficult to learn your language.

anything you need to ask, Kitty, feel free to do so smile

updated JUN 12, 2009
posted by 00494d19
0
votes

For chinese learner,it is very hard to learn pronombres acusatvos in sentence.I always can't understand what it instead and how to use it especial when writng.how can i stuty it well'If i can't understand it i am not going to learn next step!

such as:

¿Dónde compran ustedes las comidas?

**Las **compramos en el mercado.

The two las instead the same ?

The two las are different parts of speech.

las comidas...the las is a definite article or more generally an adjective as it modifies the noun comidas.

**las **compramos...the las is an object pronoun whose antecedent is comidas.

You might wish to look at this page as it gives examples in both English and Spanish.
accusative pronouns

updated JUN 12, 2009
posted by 0074b507
0
votes

Yes, because you both are talking about the same thing.

updated JUN 12, 2009
posted by paco
SpanishDict is the world's most popular Spanish-English dictionary, translation, and learning website.
© Curiosity Media Inc.
SOCIAL NETWORKS
APPS