HomeQ&ACoffee makes my stomach burns/burn (')

Coffee makes my stomach burns/burn (')

0
votes

Help please!

Coffee makes my stomach burns/burn (')

Should I use burn or burns? Why?

Thanks!

12024 views
updated JUN 16, 2009
posted by AntMexico

18 Answers

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The way we would say it in Mexico

El café hace que el estómago me arda.

In Mexico... and probably everywhere else!

updated JUN 16, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
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Toni, here are some verb patterns worth remembering:

Subject + verb + object + to infinitve
ej.
I want him to wash the car
They need Juan to walk the dog
She asked us to close the door
We told them to go away
You ordered him to leave the office

Subject + verb + object + bare infinitive
ej.
They would rather we buy a car than a truck
My parents let me stay up until 10 o´clock
My boss made me finish the report on the weekend

updated JUN 16, 2009
posted by Robert-Austin
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The way we would say it in Mexico
El café hace que el estómago me arda.

Gracias a todos y cada uno por sus respuestas.

updated JUN 16, 2009
posted by AntMexico
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As far as I am concerned "make" here expresses the subjunctive. It's the same idea as:

I would rather he travel to Paris than Rome, the bare infinitive being used here as well.

updated JUN 16, 2009
posted by Robert-Austin
0
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My first reaction was to do the same as Heitor: to show that in Spanish it is practically the same construction. You don't say:

El café me hace arde el estómago

but

El café me hace arder el estómago

using a infinitive ("arder"). The problem in English is that "ardo", "ardes", "arder" and all the rest (except "arde") look exactly the same, so it is harder to spot an infinitive as such. To make things worse, in English, the second non-finite verb (the infinitive) rarely appears right after the first verb ("to make"), giving the impression that they are not connected in any way. These constructions are classified under "multi-word verbs", because they behave as a single unit, but they require several words; this includes phrasal verbs, prepositional verbs,... Like in Spanish "suelo comer", where one verb is an auxiliary one, "make + burn" form a single "entity".

updated JUN 15, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
0
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Hola Toni: Usamos en este caso lo que se llama gramáticalmente hablando :

Bare infinitive (infinitivo sin "to")

BARE INFINITIVE. An INFINITIVE without to (win rather than to win), used: (1) After modal verbs: I must go. (2) In the pattern verb of perception plus object plus infinitive: We heard the door bang. (3) With some verbs: Let go; Help me do this; Make them pay. (4) After rather than and sooner than: I'll go without rather than pay so much. (5) In cleft sentences: All I did was ask.

Me gustaría saber qué significa "pattern verbs" y "cleft sentences".

Hi Nila
This should be a separate question. Could you please open it as a new thread.

updated JUN 15, 2009
posted by Eddy
0
votes

Hola Toni: Usamos en este caso lo que se llama gramáticalmente hablando :

Bare infinitive (infinitivo sin "to")

BARE INFINITIVE. An INFINITIVE without to (win rather than to win), used: (1) After modal verbs: I must go. (2) In the pattern verb of perception plus object plus infinitive: We heard the door bang. (3) With some verbs: Let go; Help me do this; Make them pay. (4) After rather than and sooner than: I'll go without rather than pay so much. (5) In cleft sentences: All I did was ask.

Me gustaría saber qué significa "pattern verbs" y "cleft sentences".

updated JUN 15, 2009
posted by nila45
0
votes

Help please!

Coffee makes my stomach burns/burn (')

Should I use burn or burns? Why?

Thanks!

"Coffee makes my stomach burn" is correct. However you can alter it slightly and say "When I drink coffee, my stomach burns". An interesting question. Why the change? I have no idea. But then again, grammar is not my strong point.

updated JUN 14, 2009
posted by Eddy
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votes

"coffee makes my stomach burn" (el café hace que mi estómago arda)

"coffee made my stomach burn" (el café hizo que mi estómago ardiese)

Al cambiar el tiempo de "make" por "made" también cambia el tiempo de subjuntivo.
But that's the main verb in the sentence. it's reasonable/natural that the main verb should reflect person/tense/mood.

updated JUN 13, 2009
posted by samdie
0
votes

Después de "make" va el objeto y después el verbo en infinitivo, pero sin "to". Ejemplo: don't make me laugh (no me hagas reír).

Creo que también "cause" funciona en el mismo sentido, pero al mirarlo en el diccionario me aparece con "to".

to cause sb/sth TO + INF hacer' que algn/algo + SUBJ; their criticism caused him to resign sus críticas motivaron or provocaron su renuncia, sus críticas hicieron que renunciara;
Yes. The usual discussions of the "bare infinitive" refer to its use after "modal" verbs. Unfortunately there are other verbs (beside those usually identified as "modal") with which this happens. It's more a question of language custom than of logic. As you point out, "cause" and " make" (in this context, although it can mean other things) mean the same thing and can be used interchangeably (except that after "cause" we use the "normal" infinitive, while after "make" we use the "bare" infinitive).

updated JUN 13, 2009
posted by samdie
0
votes

"coffee makes my stomach burn" (el café hace que mi estómago arda)
"coffee made my stomach burn" (el café hizo que mi estómago ardiese)

Al cambiar el tiempo de "make" por "made" también cambia el tiempo de subjuntivo.

updated JUN 13, 2009
posted by nila45
0
votes

Después de "make" va el objeto y después el verbo en infinitivo, pero sin "to". Ejemplo: don't make me laugh (no me hagas reír).

Creo que también "cause" funciona en el mismo sentido, pero al mirarlo en el diccionario me aparece con "to".

to cause sb/sth TO + INF hacer' que algn/algo + SUBJ; their criticism caused him to resign sus críticas motivaron or provocaron su renuncia, sus críticas hicieron que renunciara;

updated JUN 13, 2009
posted by nila45
0
votes

Hola Toni: Usamos en este caso lo que se llama gramáticalmente hablando :

Bare infinitive (infinitivo sin "to")

BARE INFINITIVE. An INFINITIVE without to (win rather than to win), used: (1) After modal verbs: I must go. (2) In the pattern verb of perception plus object plus infinitive: We heard the door bang. (3) With some verbs: Let go; Help me do this; Make them pay. (4) After rather than and sooner than: I'll go without rather than pay so much. (5) In cleft sentences: All I did was ask.

>

updated JUN 11, 2009
posted by 00494d19
0
votes

Sometimes it helps to think in Spanish:

El café hace mi estómago arder

The reason it is burn, not burns, is because the verb is in the infinitive, as the Spanish sentence clearly indicates. Why the 'to' gets dropped though, I know as much as qfreed...

updated JUN 11, 2009
posted by 00719c95
0
votes

it does seem contradictory to the fact that a singular subject should require burns.

My best guess would be that it is because the sentence means:

Fire makes/causes the wood to burn

Coffee makes/causes my stomach to burn

Don't ask me why we abbreviate the infinitive.

updated JUN 11, 2009
posted by 0074b507
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