Tu' and Usted

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In a document, do I have to be consistent in using either tu' or usted? In some Spanish cultures, tu' is reserved only for closest family and friends, and in others it is used very commonly. What would you recommend that I use when translating a class?
Also, for usted, what reflexive pronoun is used? I have seen it "se"-- is that correct'

3059 views
updated JUN 5, 2009
posted by Alicia2919

10 Answers

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More confusing that if you were talking to a friend and his parents and were to address him by his given name and them as Mr. and Mrs. Surname? Despite the difference of the sorts of formal indicators (lexical/syntactic devices to show (in)formality (such as the pronouns in Spanish or choice of verbs and pronouns in Japanese), there are many ways that are used in English to show familiarity/respect e.g. 1) careful/relaxed enunciation 2) more/fewer contractions 3) use/avoidance of "slang"/vulgarisms/obscenities 4) word choice (probably the most important but also the hardest to codify).

Point taken!

updated JUN 5, 2009
posted by 0074b507
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However, I believe that mixing these pronouns would result in something like "How do you do, Sir? Everything OK, dude'"

I do love this explanation on the mixing of the personbal pronouns. So descriptive.

Yes, but how does that work in practice? If I'm in mixed company, a close friend and some friends of his that I just met (or parents with their children) do you keep switching forms as you address the different individuals. That could get confusing.
More confusing that if you were talking to a friend and his parents and were to address him by his given name and them as Mr. and Mrs. Surname? Despite the difference of the sorts of formal indicators (lexical/syntactic devices to show (in)formality (such as the pronouns in Spanish or choice of verbs and pronouns in Japanese), there are many ways that are used in English to show familiarity/respect e.g. 1) careful/relaxed enunciation 2) more/fewer contractions 3) use/avoidance of "slang"/vulgarisms/obscenities 4) word choice (probably the most important but also the hardest to codify).

updated JUN 5, 2009
posted by samdie
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However, I believe that mixing these pronouns would result in something like "How do you do, Sir? Everything OK, dude'"

I do love this explanation on the mixing of the personbal pronouns. So descriptive.

Yes, but how does that work in practice? If I'm in mixed company, a close friend and some friends of his that I just met (or parents with their children) do you keep switching forms as you address the different individuals. That could get confusing.

updated JUN 5, 2009
posted by 0074b507
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However, I believe that mixing these pronouns would result in something like "How do you do, Sir? Everything OK, dude'"

I do love this explanation on the mixing of the personbal pronouns. So descriptive.

updated JUN 5, 2009
posted by Eddy
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de nada- This is how you say it's nothing right?

As Zoltán said, it means you're welcome. Not everything can be translated word for word. The closest word for word translation (to English) would probably be
don't mention it, but learning literal word for word translations won't serve you well.

No es nada is closer to it's nothing that de nada.

updated JUN 5, 2009
posted by 0074b507
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de nada- This is how you say it's nothing right?
De nada = You are welcome

updated JUN 5, 2009
posted by Zoltán
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de nada- This is how you say it's nothing right'

updated JUN 5, 2009
posted by ravensty
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Search previous threads. Different countries have different uses for "tú", "usted" and "vos", so there isn't "a" correct way to write. However, I believe that mixing these pronouns would result in something like "How do you do, Sir? Everything OK, dude'"

I don't quite get the "class" thing either.

The "usted(es)" form is identical to the third person (el / ellos) in terms of conjugation, so you have to use "se", like you do in the 3rd form. Replace "usted" with "él/ella", and nothing else should change.

P.S. Sorry ravensty, I wrote it before I saw your post.

updated JUN 4, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
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Also, for usted, what reflexive pronoun is used? I have seen it "se"-- is that correct?

Finally a question I can answer! Yes u use se

updated JUN 4, 2009
posted by ravensty
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HI alicia, what do you mean by "a class"?

please give a sentence or some sentences.

updated JUN 4, 2009
posted by 00494d19