HomeQ&Aindirect and direct object pronouns

indirect and direct object pronouns

1
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how do you know when to use these''!!!!!! i always break down the sentance i want to say into each individual word instead of seeing the "big picture" for example if the sentacne is " I will walk the dog and run" I would say " yo soy caminar el perro y correr." i think this is incorrect. any help is loved!!!!!!!

6607 views
updated OCT 19, 2011
posted by Rissie

8 Answers

0
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Yes, I agree that his suggestions look good for what the OP was trying to say. I just wanted to confirm that I could use the verb sacar in this context.

Thanks, and it's great to have someone like you here in the forum.

updated JUN 2, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
0
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Yes, you could say that as well... more or less, but I guess that if you are going to run alongside the dog, I'd rather say:

Voy a correr con el perro.

"Pasear" is not often used for running, as far as I know.

P.S.- Alfredo has even better suggestions..

updated JUN 2, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
0
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lazarus1907 you made a very good point. When I reviewed the phrase I did not look for a semantically correct answer (which I had to). So, that said, another way to go will be:

Voy a paser al perro mientras corro
Voy a correr con el perro
Saldré a correr con el perro
Saldré a dar un paseo corriendo con el perro

updated JUN 2, 2008
posted by Alfredo
0
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Lazarus,
Could we also say "Voy a sacar al perro a pasear mientras corro"? I think the OP (way back in January!) meant "I will run alongside the dog as I take him/her for a walk." Obviously the English is flawed because the dog would be running, too, not walking, but that's another issue.

updated JUN 2, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
0
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The only way you can tell when to use them is by checking them in a dictionary, or practice using them with a good book (or supervised by a teacher). Otherwise, you can make a reasonable guess, as English objects often match Spanish direct objects.

In Spain we don't say "Caminar al perro", as this verb is used without objects most of the time (you just walk, you don't "walk" others), or at least, that's what the dictionary says. If any native says that, I guess they've been influenced by the English construction. I'd say:

Voy a pasear al perro

where "pasear" is translated as as "walk (someone/an animal)", and it takes an object. This sentence is more standard regardless of the country.

updated JUN 2, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
0
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Verb conjugation is the hardest part of the Spanish language because every single one is different (well mostly) with each pronoun (person). Your example phrase will translate to this:

Caminaré (I will walk) el perro (the dog) y correré (and run)

Most people which its native language is English will first try to use the pronoun directly in the translation as in:

Yo caminaré el perro y correré

But the pronoun is already implied in the verb, so this second form is reduntant and not used at all is Spanish.

updated JUN 2, 2008
posted by Alfredo
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haha yes i've learned them before too. thanks for your helpsmile buena tarde!

updated ENE 25, 2008
posted by Rissie
0
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I have a lot of problems with this myself & sometimes it takes another learner to understand what you mean.
In your sentence, I think you are correct using the subject pronoun, although it's not necessary. will walk is the future so it s/b caminaré. I, you, he, she, we, they are doing something, use subject pronoun, usually implied, so not necessary. Of course there is reflexive, but that is another story.

object pronouns, think of as him, her, it, me, us. them.

Hope that helps a little, & that I have it right.

click on lessons & you can find more about this & much more.

.,.

updated ENE 25, 2008
posted by motley
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