HomeQ&AGuardiola s贸lo/solo mira a Roma

Guardiola s贸lo/solo mira a Roma

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We often have the question coming up whether solo should or not have an accent.
The rule is: it should not carry an accent unless there is doubt between: alone or only.

This is a very good example of how the word solo/sólo can make a difference and change the meaning of the sentence.

Guardiola is the trainer of the Barca (football club) and we are talking about the match on Wednesday in Rome which Barca will, of course, lose. ( I hope.. tongue rolleye )

However, I found the sentence an interesting example.

First meaning, accented sólo:

Guardiola is only looking towards the match in Rome. (he has nothing else in his mind and finds it very normal that his club should lose against a minor club wink )

Second meaning, solo not accented:

Guardiola alone, is looking towards the match in Rome.(Only HE is looking towards the match as his players are not into it ..jejeje)

Ok, I am sure, my friend Iker will give you a completely different version of the sentences in question, jeje LOL

2400 views
updated MAY 27, 2009
posted by 00494d19

9 Answers

0
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Nobody ever said these concepts were easy. I still think it is "looking forward to". This is because Guardiola will be happy when he gets to Rome and sees the match. Looking forward to something is an emotion you feel, and looking towards something is the physical position of your eyes.

HI Tom, the Spanish sentence means that his eyes are looking in that direction. Nowhere else, not on the recent failures or anything. NOT that he is looking forward to the match. I guess he also is, but this is not what the sentence says.

Guardiola está deseando que llegue el partido/ir a Roma...

This would be it.

updated MAY 27, 2009
posted by 00494d19
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Nobody ever said these concepts were easy. I still think it is "looking forward to". This is because Guardiola will be happy when he gets to Rome and sees the match. Looking forward to something is an emotion you feel, and looking towards something is the physical position of your eyes.

updated MAY 27, 2009
posted by tom5
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There is one more here. In English we say "looking forward to" rather than "looking toward".

Actuually, I was thinking of looking forward to, however, I don't think this is what we mean here.

Guardiola mira a Roma, means he is looking in the direction, that's why I chose towards. Would you consider that incorrect, or is it actually incorrect'

updated MAY 27, 2009
posted by 00494d19
0
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There is one more here. In English we say "looking forward to" rather than "looking toward". For example:

I am looking forward to my trip to Spain.
Looking forwards fills me with optimism.

The concept is the direction I am looking in, rather than the thing I am looking at. Make sense'

updated MAY 27, 2009
posted by tom5
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I used to teach junior high school English and none of my kids ever got this right. You did. So I guess you're showing your age as well! grin

Sesenta dos aqui. It took this trick question and a hundred like it to keep my students on their toes. I don't know where I read this or picked it up. But it stumped my kids (and a few adult friends I have as well). Thanks for the post. I wonder how many others got it, or will get it?

Hope it was okay that I digressed de español por un rato está noche. Lo siento. Regresiré ahora a la idioma aprendiendo, español, la mas que idioma hermosa y melódico.

updated MAY 27, 2009
posted by Estavan-Sawyer
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There is three errers in this sentence. What are they?

1) "is" instead of "are".

2) "errers" instead of "errors".

3) "three" instead of "two".

Unless you learned that joke when you were very young (or read it in a book), your showing your age!

updated MAY 26, 2009
posted by samdie
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Hi Heidita, your sentences have many mistakes. Let me fix them.

Easy Iker. smile Heidita was only trying to help, or should I say, "She was trying only to help'" She gently corrects my Spanish without any judgment. cool smile
Try this, Iker: There is three errers in this sentence. What are they? grin
El estudiente espanol principio, the Gospel Goucho

updated MAY 26, 2009
posted by Estavan-Sawyer
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This thread is kind of like our American English language treatment of some adverbs.
Take, for instance, the adverb "only."
Where you stick it in a sentence can change the meaning of the sentence.
1. I only thought about helping him. (I didn't think about actually doing it.)
2. Only I thought about helping him. (I was the only person who thought about helping him.)
3. I thought about helping only him. (Others needed help as well.)
4. I thought only about helping him. (The thought of helping him consumed me.)cool smile

updated MAY 26, 2009
posted by Estavan-Sawyer
0
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Hi Heidita, your sentences have many mistakes. Let me fix them.

Guardiola is the trainer / coach of the Barca (football club) and we are talking about the match on Wednesday in Rome which Barca will, of course, [del]lose[/del] win. ( I hope.. tongue rolleye ')what means rolleye? hehe

Guardiola is only looking towards the match in Rome. (he has nothing else in his mind and finds it very normal that his club should [del]lose[/del] win against a [del]minor[/del] great club wink )

Tengo estas dos frases que no sé si contienen algún error. (creo que no). cool smile
Cuardiola sólo espera ganar este miércoles puesto que no pasa por su cabeza la palabra perder.
Guardiola por sí solo se basta para hacer frente a toda la presión mediática' en vísperas de la final de la "Champions League".

' Procedente del Reino Unido y sectores próximos al Real Madrid. (Heidita & cia) LOL

updated MAY 26, 2009
posted by iker
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