Sample sentences for Spanish tenses

5
votes

I am learning Spanish but have great difficulty understanding when to use some of the verb conjugations. Would it be possible to include some sample sentences at least for a few of the more Common verbs - instead of just what we see in the "Conjugation" section? Preferably with what such sentences would be in English.

82240 views
updated AGO 31, 2016
posted by ian-hill

31 Answers

1
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Bumping this up

updated OCT 10, 2017
posted by rac1
1
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This is AMAZING! Muchas gracias!!!

updated OCT 10, 2017
posted by Chavag
1
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Apart from everything else that has been mentioned in the replies to you question/complaint, the answer should be "because the "Conjugation" section would not be the appropriate place for dealing with such problems. The purpose of the conjugation section is to supply the correct endings/inflections of verbs (especially "irregular" verbs) in various tenses. The issue of why/when one should use specific tenses does not depend on which verb is under discussion (it's the tense, not the verb, that matters) and, therefore, is more properly treated under a discussion of tenses (and their uses), as is done in the grammar section.

updated OCT 10, 2017
posted by samdie
1
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Ian, go to the "Reference" section; then select "Verbs". You will find sub-groups for tenses. Some (such as the progressive tenses) are lumped together under a single heading. Within each group there is a general discussion about the use/meaning of the tense and example sentences by way of illustration.

updated OCT 10, 2017
posted by samdie
1
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Heidita
Aprendí mucho de este.
Estoy muy agradecido por las respuestas. grin

updated OCT 10, 2017
posted by ian-hill
1
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Samdie

Thanks again

I never expected ALL verbs or even one to be illustrated in the Conjugation section.

But I got what I wanted thanks to people taking an interest.

grin

Hi Ian, I am very happy to see you got what you needed. I understood you meant you were looking for sample sentences on the conjugation page.

I changed the title slightly so that more people might see this interesting thread.

I must say that you got such good answers as all our best forers participated in this thread. smile

Esto se llama poder de convocatoria grin

updated OCT 10, 2017
posted by 00494d19
1
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Samdie
Thanks again
I never expected ALL verbs or even one to be illustrated in the Conjugation section.
But I got what I wanted thanks to people taking an interest.
grin

updated OCT 10, 2017
posted by ian-hill
1
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Thank you Lazarus and Samdie - your comments helped a lot. They are now carefully recorded in a file on my computer. Once again thank you.

updated OCT 10, 2017
posted by ian-hill
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Well, let's take one thing at a time:

1) The work involved for a human to make natural-sounding sentences: this would be a lot of work, even for a few select verbs,

That's what I meant, Ian, when I said "impossible" do you imagine how much work and probably space that would involve? And would that really be an improvement? Or would it clutter up the page as Vikingo has indicated below?

2) Usefulness: If you learn the tenses and their uses, the need for examples for every verb would dimish sharply. It might even be superfluous.
You would probably not only need one sentence but several as many verbs can have many different meanings.

In any case, Ian, I still don't understand why the examples Lazarus gave on his link are not useful for you. You can apply them to different verbs.

updated OCT 10, 2017
posted by 00494d19
1
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HI Ian, this is impossible , however, why don't you suggest some sentences or verbs and we could see.
However, if you have the verb, the dictionary supplies a lot fo sample sentences.

updated OCT 10, 2017
posted by 00494d19
1
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Another new picture Heidita - where do you get them from?
I don't agree that it is "impossible". If what is shown in the "Conjugation" page is for real then of course sentences could be made for each "form" of the verb shown. A lot of work but not "impossible". Maybe I should try and make a page for at least one verb and see what happens.

updated AGO 30, 2016
posted by ian-hill
1
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Thank you Samdie.
I have looked at what you suggest.
What I was suggesting was something like this. But in Spanish

Simple Present]
I study English everyday.
Simple Past
Two years ago, I studied English in England.
Simple Future
I will help you study English.
I am going to study English next year.

Present Continuous
I am studying English now.
Past Continuous
I was studying English when you called yesterday.
Future Continuous
I will be studying English when you arrive tonight.
I am going to be studying English when you arrive tonight.

Present Perfect
I have studied English in several different countries.
Past Perfect
I had studied a little English before I moved to the U.S.
Future Perfect
I will have studied every tense by the time I finish this course.
I am going to have studied every tense by the time I finish this course.

Present Perfect Continuous
I have been studying English for five years.
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been studying English for five years before I moved to the US
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been studying English for over two hours by the time you arrive
I am going to have been studying English for over two hours by the time you arrive.

I did study English every day.
I used to study English every day.

The subjunctive is almost non-existent in English
and the imperative is just the base verb so don't have to be taught really.

updated AGO 30, 2016
posted by ian-hill
1
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I appreciate the replies above but now I give up.
If I (or you) can create a sentence illustrating each and every form of a verb in English why should that be impossible in Spanish? At least for one verb - say Comer.
By the way I was not asking that a computer do the task. I "know" that computers will never be able to do it for all situations.
I will not try to explain further because I have not been able, apparently, to express myself clearly enough to get a reply I expected.
I will ask this: Do you have any idea how daunting it is for someone who is learning Spanish to be confronted with what is shown in the "Conjugations" section?
Heitor Thank you for the Google links by the way.

updated AGO 30, 2016
posted by ian-hill
Would this help? http://www.123teachme.com/translated_sentences/sp
1
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Heitor
Thank you for your conciliatory comments. I have not given up learning Spanish but I still refuse to believe that it is impossible to create sentences illustrating each and every form of at least one verb - I mentioned Comer as an example. If these forms exist it must be possible. I must say I resent being told it is "pointless"
Whether or not we learners know what conjugation is or not is irrelevant. For me tense is about time only. Mood / MOde and all the other stuff is just academic language used to describe language.
I will give up on this thread unless someone tells why what I ask for (now only for one verb) is "impossible". Even if it takes several sample sentences for the same form of the verb. I know the simple present for example in English can be used to mean the "future" so I would make more than one illustrative sentence.

Heidita
What Lazarus wrote was helpful but it was not what I was asking for.

updated DIC 19, 2011
posted by ian-hill
1
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I appreciate the replies above but now I give up.

Don't give up, I'm particularly interested in this conversation.

If I (or you) can create a sentence illustrating each and every form of a verb in English why should that be impossible in Spanish? At least for one verb - say Comer.

I don't think this is a matter of difficulty as much as of it being pointless. Unless you see several sentences in various contexts, you will probably not grasp the full meaning of a particular tense/mode.

I will ask this: Do you have any idea how daunting it is for someone who is learning Spanish to be confronted with what is shown in the "Conjugations" section?

In my case, I don't really have a clear idea, but I suspect the whole concept of "conjugation" is somewhat foreign to English speakers. Conjugation does exist in English but it is so trivial it does not merit much, or any, thought.

I was wondering if perhaps you do not really understand what "conjugation" means. Lazarus has already explained it but I will try a different approach:

There are two aspects to verb usage; one is the "mode", the idea or tense you are trying to express; the other is the "person", the subject of the verb. Those two things are separate. Conjugation refers strictly to the "person" aspect, and apart from irregular verbs it is formulaic and a matter of rote learning (which is why it can be done by computers)

The "mode" aspect, however, is quite tricky because it's full of nuances. Those, as Lazarus said, must be learned one at a time, and you will probably never fully master some of the more esoteric ones (trust me, apart from the teachers here even native speakers have trouble with this stuff)

Do you think this distinction helps, or have I just added to your confusion? If it helps, it might be possible to go from here. If you're still confused, we can try to make it clearer.

updated DIC 19, 2011
posted by 00719c95