HomeQ&AStrange Spanish:'trienta y ....? for thirty

Strange Spanish:'trienta y ....? for thirty

0
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Can anyone tell me if there is anywhere in the Spanish-speaking world that they say "trienta y ...." for thirty something, (and pronounce it accordingly)....or is this simply a mistake?
Would love to know from all you Spanish-speakers around the world'

11085 views
updated MAY 19, 2009
posted by Annieartblue

11 Answers

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The latest pearl of wisdom is to not have an oral examination when learning a foreign (another one for your list) language. It can embarrass the student. WELL IT WOULDN'T IF THEY LEARNT HOW TO SAY IT CORRECTLY.

Now that is really surprising! gulp

In Spain they are introducing, I think from next year onward, a possibility to improve your mark if in the final a-level exams (similar anyway, it is called "selectividad") you take an oral exam apart from the written one in English or the language you chose. I think that is an excellent idea.

updated MAY 19, 2009
posted by 00494d19
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And I apologize as I followed your suit and misspelled it also. It's just a bad habit for English speakers to always want to put the "i before e except after c ..."

Always put the "i" before "e" (except after "c")? Do you mean, like in "weight", "reign", "rein", "freight", "seize", "counterfeit", "protein", "Budweiser", "Rayleigh", "caffeine", "poltergeist", "beige", "seeing", "ageing", "albeit", "atheism",..

Surely that wasn't a spelling rule, was it? English, as far as I know, has no general spelling rules. There are about half a million spelling rules in English; one for every word.

Actually the entire rhyming rule (for elementary school students) is "I before E except after C or when sounding like A as in neighbor and weigh." My point was that in typing, your mind (fingers) remembers patterns. I'm forever mistyping their, even though I know how to spell it, because my fingers are used to hitting ie rather than ei as it is the more common pattern in English words.

updated MAY 19, 2009
posted by 0074b507
0
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And I apologize as I followed your suit and misspelled it also. It's just a bad habit for English speakers to always want to put the "i before e except after c ..."

Always put the "i" before "e" (except after "c")? Do you mean, like in "weight", "reign", "rein", "freight", "seize", "counterfeit", "protein", "Budweiser", "Rayleigh", "caffeine", "poltergeist", "beige", "seeing", "ageing", "albeit", "atheism",..

Surely that wasn't a spelling rule, was it? English, as far as I know, has no general spelling rules. There are about half a million spelling rules in English; one for every word.

Now just you stop there Lazarus. In no way can we here in England be held resposible for the spelling of Budweiser. The others above, you have a case, hehe.
In any event, our teachers stopped correcting spelling in our schools years ago, their reasoning, it was preventing natural expression. The latest pearl of wisdom is to not have an oral examination when learning a foreign (another one for your list) language. It can embarrass the student. WELL IT WOULDN'T IF THEY LEARNT HOW TO SAY IT CORRECTLY.

updated MAY 19, 2009
posted by Eddy
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English, as far as I know, has no general spelling rules. There are about half a million spelling rules in English; one for every word.

I disagree: There are a some spelling rules, and about half a millon exceptions. tongue rolleye

updated MAY 18, 2009
posted by 00494d19
0
votes

And I apologize as I followed your suit and misspelled it also. It's just a bad habit for English speakers to always want to put the "i before e except after c ..."

Always put the "i" before "e" (except after "c")? Do you mean, like in "weight", "reign", "rein", "freight", "seize", "counterfeit", "protein", "Budweiser", "Rayleigh", "caffeine", "poltergeist", "beige", "seeing", "ageing", "albeit", "atheism",..

Surely that wasn't a spelling rule, was it? English, as far as I know, has no general spelling rules. There are about half a million spelling rules in English; one for every word.

updated MAY 18, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
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votes

Hi qfree and Administrator,

Thanks, interesting about the use of "trientas" for the thirties but what I am referring to is in the Spanishdict flashcards section,under numbers (the 4th set of number flashcards (38 - easy level) - they write trienta for 30 and pronounce it accordingly and for 135 write cientrotrienta y cinco. I have asked Spanish-speaking friends in the UK (Colombian and Spanish) and they are puzzled about the "ie" instead of "ei".

Hi Annie

Unfortunately your original post did not make any reference to the flashcards and the possible mistake. I thought you had just typed "treinta" incorrectly. In future if you make your posts clear we can provide you with correct information. I believe Lazarus has now answered your ammended post.

And I apologize as I followed your suit and misspelled it also. It's just a bad habit for English speakers to always want to put the "i before e except after c ..."

updated MAY 18, 2009
posted by 0074b507
0
votes

Can anyone tell me if there is anywhere in the Spanish-speaking world that they say "trienta y ...." for thirty something, (and pronounce it accordingly)....or is this simply a mistake?

Would love to know from all you Spanish-speakers around the world?

the thirties= los años treintas

Whether an applicable context would be the 1930's or the ages 30-39 would have to come from someone more knowledgeable.

http://www.wordreference.com/es/translation.asp'tranword=thirty+something

updated MAY 18, 2009
posted by 0074b507
0
votes

Hi qfree and Administrator,

Thanks, interesting about the use of "trientas" for the thirties but what I am referring to is in the Spanishdict flashcards section,under numbers (the 4th set of number flashcards (38 - easy level) - they write trienta for 30 and pronounce it accordingly and for 135 write cientrotrienta y cinco. I have asked Spanish-speaking friends in the UK (Colombian and Spanish) and they are puzzled about the "ie" instead of "ei".

Hi Annie
Unfortunately your original post did not make any reference to the flashcards and the possible mistake. I thought you had just typed "treinta" incorrectly. In future if you make your posts clear we can provide you with correct information. I believe Lazarus has now answered your ammended post.

updated MAY 18, 2009
posted by Eddy
0
votes

It is a mistake. It should be treinta.

updated MAY 18, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

Hi qfree and Administrator,

Thanks, interesting about the use of "trientas" for the thirties but what I am referring to is in the Spanishdict flashcards section,under numbers (the 4th set of number flashcards (38 - easy level) - they write trienta for 30 and pronounce it accordingly and for 135 write cientrotrienta y cinco. I have asked Spanish-speaking friends in the UK (Colombian and Spanish) and they are puzzled about the "ie" instead of "ei".

updated MAY 18, 2009
posted by Annieartblue
0
votes

Can anyone tell me if there is anywhere in the Spanish-speaking world that they say "trienta y ...." for thirty something, (and pronounce it accordingly)....or is this simply a mistake?

Would love to know from all you Spanish-speakers around the world?

Well if you have seen qfreed´s link, it would appear that "treinta y tantos" is what you are looking for. How many countries this is used in needs to be answered by other members more knowledgeable .

updated MAY 18, 2009
posted by Eddy
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