pero versus sino and sino que

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I need to know what are the definitive rules with reference to the use of pero and sino and sino que.

8165 views
updated OCT 19, 2009
posted by albertwilliam

8 Answers

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updated OCT 19, 2009
edited by 0074b507
posted by 0074b507
excellent quen, thanks
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Te recomiendo la lección 3.15.

updated OCT 19, 2009
posted by Maciek071
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¿Puede[del]s[/del] alguien darnos [del]nuestros[/del] algunos ejemplos de la expresión "sino que" en algunas frases, por favor? cool smile

Hola Estavan: ¡Qué bueno que intentas escribir en español! way to go!

Una sentencia en español es la que se da en un juzgado.

updated MAY 20, 2009
posted by 00494d19
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Just a guess but how about "no es que parezca ser un idiota sino que es un idiota verdadero" - it´s not that he appears to be an idiot, he is one. Probably wrong but hey, I did try.

It is correct, Eddy, although we normally say "No es que parezca idiota, sino que lo es".

updated MAY 17, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
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¿Puedes alguien dar nuestros algunos ejemplos de el frase "sino que" en algunos sentencias, por favor? cool smile

Just a guess but how about "no es que parezca ser un idiota sino que es un idiota verdadero" - it´s not that he appears to be an idiot, he is one. Probably wrong but hey, I did try.

updated MAY 17, 2009
posted by Eddy
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¿Puedes alguien dar nuestros algunos ejemplos de el frase "sino que" en algunos sentencias, por favor? cool smile

updated MAY 17, 2009
posted by Estavan-Sawyer
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"Pero" is used after another statement to point out the drawbacks or anything that conflicts with it (It is cute, but it is too expensive).

"Sino" is used to provide a positive idea after a negative one (not this, but that). In English, both "pero" and "sino" are one word: "but". If you write "que" after "sino", it becomes "sino que"; if you write "sino tú", it becomes "sino tú", and if you write "Albert", it becomes "sino Albert", but we are still talking about the same "sino". Normally, the positive idea is a noun, but if you require a verb to express a more complex positive idea, you need a subordinate clause instead. These clauses are introduced by different words, among which, "que" is by far the most common one. "Sino que" is not a unit on itself, but two words that happen to be together. It would be like asking what is the difference between "to" and "to the".

updated MAY 17, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
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I need to know what are the definitive rules with reference to the use of pero and sino and sino que.

I believe sino is used instead of pero after a negative statement. No son ocho sino nueve - there are not eight but nine. I am not too sure about sino que but the same rule may apply.

updated MAY 16, 2009
posted by Eddy