HomeQ&ANunca dejo el agua abierta.

Nunca dejo el agua abierta.

0
votes

"Nunca dejo el agua abierta".
Me he encontrado con que tengo que traducir esta frase y me parece que debe ser así. **"I never leave the tap open". ** (nunca dejo el grifo abierto)

Utilizo "open" en vez de "opened" porque he observado que cuando digo "la tienda está abierta", se dice "the shop is open". Sólo, se dice, "opened" en frases como ésta "I have opened the window".

¿Puede alguien verificar si lo que estoy diciendo es correcto'

2844 views
updated FEB 7, 2011
posted by nila45

9 Answers

0
votes

"Nunca dejo el agua abierta".

Me he encontrado con que tengo que traducir esta frase y me parece que debe ser así. **"I never leave the tap open". ** (nunca dejo el grifo abierto)

Utilizo "open" en vez de "opened" porque he observado que cuando digo "la tienda está abierta", se dice "the shop is open". Sólo, se dice, "opened" en frases como ésta "I have opened the window".

¿Puede alguien verificar si lo que estoy diciendo es correcto?

It sounds correct to me (the tap is open), but not what would be use to describe the situation in English. When we discuss valves in general we use the terms open and closed, but when we speak about the item that is being controlled by that valve we usually describe it as being on or off. When you open/close the gas valve on your stove we normally say that you are turning the gas on/off. In your case I would say that I never leave the water on (or running). For some reason open sounds good to my ear with tap, but if you had said faucet then I would use on/off. I suppose it's just a matter of custom or personal preference.
Oops! I re-read your note and saw that that seems to be exactly the point that you are making. Yes, I never leave the water open sounds incorrect in English.

updated FEB 7, 2011
posted by 0074b507
0
votes

in my idiolect the tap is open/closed or, preferentially, the "water is on (running)/off".

A ver si entiendo bien. A tí te parece raro decir: I never leave the water running. En español, eso significa "nunca dejo el agua corriendo". O sea, según entiendo, a tí te parece mejor decir: "I never leave the tap on" porque tú piensas que es más correcto decir "the tap" que "the water". Bueno, si lo pienso bien también en español se debería decir "nunca dejo el grifo abierto" (refiriéndome al desperdicio del agua). Para utilizar "agua" en vez de "grifo" sería en otras expresiones. Por ejemplo, yo diría en un texto: "el agua estaba corriendo".

Pero, claro, en el contexto del desperdicio del agua suena mejor decir "el grifo abierto o cerrado" que "el agua".

Bueno, corríjeme si no he entendido bien tus palabras.
I wasn't clear enough. If I were speaking of the state/condition of the tap/faucet, I would use open/closed. However, most of the time, for the general situation, I would say "the water is running", rather than, the "tap is open" (I'm more interested in the water than in the tap).

updated MAY 15, 2009
posted by samdie
0
votes

This is (at least in the U.S.) very much subject to regional variation. I, for one, would never use "the tap on/off" (in my idiolect the tap is open/closed or, preferentially, the "water is on (running)/off". Similarly, I turn the lights on/off but I know that some of my compatriots "open/close the lights". Almost anything (actually anything that I can think of) that has a bipolar switch, I would consider to be "on" or "off". For the most part, things that allow degrees of functionality, I would refer to as open/closed (even though that is a simple dichotomy) e.g. windows, blinds, doors etc. The case of the "water running" is, I suppose, peculiar but I attribute it to a concern for the water (that is/may be wasted) rather than condition of the tap.

A ver si entiendo bien. A tí te parece raro decir: I never leave the water running. En español, eso significa "nunca dejo el agua corriendo". O sea, según entiendo, a tí te parece mejor decir: "I never leave the tap on" porque tú piensas que es más correcto decir "the tap" que "the water". Bueno, si lo pienso bien también en español se debería decir "nunca dejo el grifo abierto" (refiriéndome al desperdicio del agua). Para utilizar "agua" en vez de "grifo" sería en otras expresiones. Por ejemplo, yo diría en un texto: "el agua estaba corriendo".
Pero, claro, en el contexto del desperdicio del agua suena mejor decir "el grifo abierto o cerrado" que "el agua".
Bueno, corríjeme si no he entendido bien tus palabras.

updated MAY 14, 2009
posted by nila45
0
votes

This is (at least in the U.S.) very much subject to regional variation. I, for one, would never use "the tap on/off" (in my idiolect the tap is open/closed or, preferentially, the "water is on (running)/off". Similarly, I turn the lights on/off but I know that some of my compatriots "open/close the lights". Almost anything (actually anything that I can think of) that has a bipolar switch, I would consider to be "on" or "off". For the most part, things that allow degrees of functionality, I would refer to as open/closed (even though that is a simple dichotomy) e.g. windows, blinds, doors etc. The case of the "water running" is, I suppose, peculiar but I attribute it to a concern for the water (that is/may be wasted) rather than condition of the tap.

updated MAY 13, 2009
posted by samdie
0
votes

"I never leave the water running". Esta también parece que tiene sentido. Gracias.

updated MAY 13, 2009
posted by nila45
0
votes

Acabo de entrar en el diccionario de este sitio Web y al poner la palabra "abierto" ¿qué es lo que encuentro'. En uno de los ejemplos pone: to leave the tap on or running.

¿Quiere éso decir que se puede poner de las dos maneras: "I never leave the tap on". Y también "I never leave the water on". ¿Está bien de las dos maneras?

Se dice: I never leave the tap on. I never leave the water running. (El agua corre) (El grifo se cierra)

updated MAY 9, 2009
posted by 00b83c38
0
votes

Acabo de entrar en el diccionario de este sitio Web y al poner la palabra "abierto" ¿qué es lo que encuentro'. En uno de los ejemplos pone: to leave the tap on or running.
¿Quiere éso decir que se puede poner de las dos maneras: "I never leave the tap on". Y también "I never leave the water on". ¿Está bien de las dos maneras'

updated MAY 9, 2009
posted by nila45
0
votes

Entonces, para decir que nunca dejo el grifo abierto, está bien decir: 'I never leave the water on', ¿no'.

Correcto

updated MAY 9, 2009
posted by 00b83c38
0
votes

"Nunca dejo el agua abierta".

Me he encontrado con que tengo que traducir esta frase y me parece que debe ser así. **"I never leave the tap open". ** (nunca dejo el grifo abierto)

Utilizo "open" en vez de "opened" porque he observado que cuando digo "la tienda está abierta", se dice "the shop is open". Sólo, se dice, "opened" en frases como ésta "I have opened the window".

¿Puede alguien verificar si lo que estoy diciendo es correcto?

It sounds correct to me (the tap is open), but not what would be use to describe the situation in English. When we discuss valves in general we use the terms open and closed, but when we speak about the item that is being controlled by that valve we usually describe it as being on or off. When you open/close the gas valve on your stove we normally say that you are turning the gas on/off. In your case I would say that I never leave the water on (or running). For some reason open sounds good to my ear with tap, but if you had said faucet then I would use on/off. I suppose it's just a matter of custom or personal preference.

Oops! I re-read your note and saw that that seems to be exactly the point that you are making. Yes, I never leave the water open sounds incorrect in English.

Entonces, para decir que nunca dejo el grifo abierto, está bien decir: "I never leave the water on", ¿no'.

updated MAY 9, 2009
posted by nila45
SpanishDict is the world's most popular Spanish-English dictionary, translation, and learning website.
© Curiosity Media Inc.