estúpido vs tonto, ect?

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estúpido vs tonto
conocer vs saber
bonita vs bella

is there certain times to use these or are they possibly regional use or personal/regional preference? i get confused when words have the same definition

12376 views
updated MAY 6, 2009
posted by brandon2

45 Answers

2
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Estúpido is stupid; you don't need a dictionary for that. Tonto is more like silly; nothing to do with weird.

2.) Conocer is when you know someone. Saber is when you know something.

Most definitely not! Look at this example: ¿Conoces un restaurante llamado Gino? ¿Sabes si hay un buen restaurante por aquí'

Conocer is used with people, things and places we are familiar with, and saber is used with pieces of information, facts and matters.

updated JUN 14, 2012
posted by lazarus1907
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Thank you everybody for the interesting discussion. I think the question has been answered and we can move on. smile

This thread is closed.

updated MAY 6, 2009
posted by 00494d19
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con "smilies" con la[del]s[/del] lengua[del]s[/del] afuera[del]s[/del].

Tal caso sería lengua (a)fuera. Yo tampoco usaría "afuera", pero no va en plural, más que nada porque es un adverbio.

Tampoco sería lenguas, ya que siempre es el mismo smiley que tiene una sola lengua.

Lazarus, abre un hilo nuevo si deseas discutir el tema de "fuera/afuera".

updated MAY 6, 2009
posted by 00494d19
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Also, to the person who said I am arguing about this just to be stubborn, you can be excused, as a newcomer to this forum, for not knowing that **I have gladly accepted corrections **countless times here, and that my only purpose here is to improve my Spanish and maybe to help some others along the way. But before shooting in the dark, it might be better to be more sure about your target.

Estavan is a newbie and does not know you well, but seeing a post like this one on this thread cannot make him think any other way. You were told that this use is simply incorrect.

Así que mi conclusión es que aunque no se considere correcto gramaticalmente, es un uso muy común aquí en las Américas, de hecho, mucho más común que la forma 'correcta? (por lo menos en la lengua hablada), y yo, por mi parte, voy a seguir usándola.However, your knowledge and translation abilities are not under judgement here or anywhere else. Judgment in itself is not the right word as we have no intention to judge anybody here. Nevertheless you do have a tendency to talk "ex-catedra" which is neither helpful nor so much appreciated as you seem to think.

There have been several native English speakers on this thread to comment on your assertion that weird is a synonym of stupid. Actually we have forgotten the origin of this: The Spanish word "tonto". Raro is not tonto, not here nor anywhere else.

This was said by Lazarus:

'Hacer el tonto? does not imply that you are doing a weird thing; you are telling the person not to behave like a stupid person would, even though you know he is not.

Talking about accepting corrections.... wink

updated MAY 6, 2009
posted by 00494d19
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"afuera" is used frequently on many of the flashcards.

updated MAY 6, 2009
posted by Mark-Baker
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I wonder what would happen if we took a poll of the members who just observed this thread without posting a reply.
Here's the one multiple choice question for them:
This thread was:
a. Engaging
b. Thought provoking
c. Stupid
d. Weird

updated MAY 6, 2009
posted by Estavan-Sawyer
0
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Being Weird is not the same as being Stupid.

Exhibiting "a weird" behaviour or characteristic does not make someone "stupid". It means their personality has a bizarre facet, which is totally different to behaving "stupid".

Americans love to get hold of certain words and phrases, use their American accents to subjugate the sound and then turn them into fashion icons. "Oh my God", "Oh man" and of course "Weird" are such phrases. Fashionable sayings are normally associated with younger generations whether that seems condescending or not. Nevertheless, being weird will never be the same as being stupid.

Einstein was weird and eccentric...does that mean he was stupid'

updated MAY 6, 2009
posted by Mark-Baker
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Mark wrote "Personally, I think this must stem from your younger days," to which you replied "I was going to say exactly the same thing but I kept quiet..."

I don't think it's too far-fetched to believe that teenage talk sometimes ends up becoming mainstream, particularly as those teenagers grow up. What I meant was that "weird", in American English, could have expanded its meaning in your generation. But I have no way to know for sure, which is why I kept quiet.

But, to quote Alan Greenspan, if I have made myself clear, you have misunderstood me smile

updated MAY 6, 2009
posted by 00719c95
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James, you have misread the trust to my post.

Americans use "weird" and other such words like "far out", "stuff" and "man" with entirely different meaning. It's instilled within Children in the United States. I suppose they copy the sayings used by older kids and adults - like its an American Culture.

Therefore using weird for a substitue for stupidity is not correct, even though youngsters in the States use weird in that way to refer to a multitude of things in order to be melodramatic.....it still doesn't make it correct.

updated MAY 6, 2009
posted by Mark-Baker
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Mark wrote "Personally, I think this must stem from your younger days," to which you replied "I was going to say exactly the same thing but I kept quiet..." My post was mainly directed to Mark, but I have to say that I interpret what you wrote as meaning that you agree with him. If it weren't something that might be taken the wrong way, then you wouldn't have to keep quiet. I hope you'll tell me if I have misinterpreted you.

At any rate, it takes more than this to hurt my feelings. I just thought it was rather condescending for Mark to dismiss my claims about this usage by saying that it was some remnant from when I spoke like a teenager. At the age of nearly 50 and after 20 years of writing for a living, I wouldn't like to think that that were true. But thanks for the conciliatory note, which is appreciated.

Also, to the person who said I am arguing about this just to be stubborn, you can be excused, as a newcomer to this forum, for not knowing that I have gladly accepted corrections countless times here, and that my only purpose here is to improve my Spanish and maybe to help some others along the way. But before shooting in the dark, it might be better to be more sure about your target.

updated MAY 6, 2009
posted by 00bacfba
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Cualquiera que haya leído mis miles de mensajes en este foro y que siga pensando que mi uso de inglés es de alguna manera infantil...

I am no authority to judge anyone's use of what to me is a foreign language. All I said was that my children use "weird" in ways that are consistent with your position. That is a fact and there is nothing I can do about it (other than keep it to myself, which I did until Mark spoke)

Sorry if that hurt your feelings. It was not my intention, I like and respect you.

updated MAY 6, 2009
posted by 00719c95
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Pese a que cada vez son más comunes, sintagmas como "lengua afuera" me resultan inaceptables, quizá porque estoy acostumbrado a "lengua fuera". ¿Cómo se sienten otros hispanohablantes? (y me refiero a aquellos que lo usan con frecuencia entre personas cultas que se esmeran por hablar "bien").

No siendo hispanohablante, no estoy seguro, pero el diccionario de WR dice lo siguiente.

hang out
1. v + o + adv, v + adv + o 'washing? tender(conj.'), colgar(conj.');
'flag? poner(conj.')
2. v + adv (dangle) [wires] estar(conj.') suelto;
with his shirt/tongue ~ing out con la camisa/la lengua afuera

Gracias por las palabras simpáticas.

updated MAY 6, 2009
posted by 00bacfba
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James: cualquiera que piense que tus mensajes son infantiles o inmaduros es, o bien muy inocente, o algo idiota, y en cualquier caso, yo sería el primero en defender a uno de los foreros más juiciosos e inteligentes de este foro.

Pero cambiando de tema un poco, me interesa saber qué piensan otros sobre esto: los adverbios en "a" que solían ser exclusivamente dinámicos (es decir, con una "a" inicial), como "afuera", han empezado a sustituir a los estáticos (sin "a") como "fuera". Pese a que cada vez son más comunes, sintagmas como "lengua afuera" me resultan inaceptables, quizá porque estoy acostumbrado a "lengua fuera". ¿Cómo se sienten otros hispanohablantes? (y me refiero a aquellos que lo usan con frecuencia entre personas cultas que se esmeran por hablar "bien").

updated MAY 6, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
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Cualquiera que haya leído mis miles de mensajes en este foro y que siga pensando que mi uso de inglés es de alguna manera infantil o inmaduro es...bueno, digamos que me tendría que rebajar a ser infantil para decir lo que pienso. Y si yo de veras fuera infantil, cubriría mis mensajes con "smileis" con las lenguas afueras.

updated MAY 6, 2009
posted by 00bacfba
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I think this must stem from your younger days since I understand "weird" is an insult children in the USA often use to get their own way by denigrating people with the term "being weird" when the situation fails to conform with their own wishes.

I was going to say exactly the same thing but I kept quiet because English is not my language. But I have two children and the impression I get is that they use "weird" to mean whatever they want it to mean. They also use "exactly", "random", and a few other words in very strange ways.

updated MAY 6, 2009
posted by 00719c95