just up

0
votes

¿Cómo traduciríamos lo siguiente en una manera muy natural y coloquial?

It's just up the street/block. (Es decir, se halla en esta calle/manzana, a poca distancia.)

Creo que he oído decir "está cerquita nomás" para deicr algo como "it's just up a ways," pero quiero incluir el concepto de estar en esta calle.

3398 views
updated ABR 24, 2009
posted by 00bacfba

15 Answers

0
votes

Here is my feeble response from a Spanish book for 9 - 10 year olds.

"Sigan recto por esta carretera." also "Una poco vez adentro."

updated ABR 24, 2009
posted by Daniel
0
votes

Yo he escuchado "Aquí no más" cuando alguien estaba refiriendo a algo cercana.

updated ABR 24, 2009
posted by Nathaniel
0
votes

Nomás no se usa en España, pero equivale a decir:

hazlo sin más, sin más miramientos, sin rodeos, simplemente así..

Soy un hombre nomás = solo soy un hombre.

siga nomás = simplemente siga

updated ABR 24, 2009
posted by 00494d19
0
votes

"Nomás" is very common here in Ecuador and now I think about it "just keep going" is a very acurate translation.

updated ABR 24, 2009
posted by Robert-Austin
0
votes

I have heard the expression "siga nomás" used in Ecuador a lot. It's used on buses to indicate something like "keep walking towards the back of the bus" (more or less).

Yes, it adds a certain flavor that in many cases is very close to "just" in English.

Keep going / Siga
Just keep going / Siga nomás

A bus driver might say either of these, but the second one has a bit more oomph to it. I love this word for this reason; it often allows me to express exactly what I'm thinking in English.

When I lived in Japan, people would sometimes ask me to explain such uses of "just," and I found it almost impossible to do so. It's extremely common and very useful, but I just can't put my finger on what exactly it adds to a sentence!

updated ABR 24, 2009
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

Yes, it's correct. It's just a regional word. The DRAE says this:

nomás.

  1. adv. m. Am. Mer., C. Rica, Hond., Méx. y Nic. no más (? solamente).

  2. adv. m. Am. Mer., El Salv., Hond. y Méx. U. en oraciones exhortativas, generalmente pospuesto, para añadir énfasis a la expresión. Pase nomás. Atrévase nomás.

  3. adv. m. Arg., Bol., Col., El Salv., Nic. y Ur. Apenas, precisamente.

I have heard the expression "siga nomás" used in Ecuador a lot. It's used on buses to indicate something like "keep walking towards the back of the bus" (more or less). I have never seen it written and always thought that it was written as "no más". Anyway, I was wondering if in that context the written form has to be "nomás" rather than "no más".

updated ABR 24, 2009
posted by Robert-Austin
0
votes

Thanks, Di.

updated ABR 24, 2009
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

How about something like, "siga un poco más por esta cuadra..."'

updated ABR 24, 2009
posted by LadyDi
0
votes

-It's just up the street/block.

esta alla arriba,a una cuadra

But that sounds like "It's a block away," while "just up the block/street" may mean two houses away, while the block continues on for another fifteen houses.

esta alla arriba en esta calle

¡Eso sí que es mejor! (Or, SOCKS mejor!)

My dear friend, I am afraid that I am unable to find an exact translation for your query; but, like my dear departed grandpa used to say ....picky, picky, picky

Hey, I'm a translator, so being picky is a job requirement.

Thanks for the help.

updated ABR 24, 2009
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

Excuse me, do you know where John Smith's house is?
permiso, sabe donde esta la casa de J.M.

-It's just up the street/block.
esta alla arriba,a una cuadra

-How do I get to the grocery store......answer,call a taxi cab
donde esta la tienda de comestibles?
como llego a la tienda de viberes?
que camino me lleva a la tienda?

-It's just up the street/block.

esta alla arriba en esta calle

My dear friend, I am afraid that I am unable to find an exact translation for your query; but, like my dear departed grandpa used to say ....picky, picky, picky

disclaimer...... one of this day, am getting one right

updated ABR 24, 2009
posted by 00769608
0
votes

'Nomás? is a single word, and is an adverb

To my mind "nomás" does not exist in the Spanish language. Does the Real Academia have a view, as far as anyone knows?

I heard it an awful lot in Nicaragua particularly, but I don´t think it´s correct.

Yes, it's correct. It's just a regional word. The DRAE says this:

nomás.
1. adv. m. Am. Mer., C. Rica, Hond., Méx. y Nic. no más (? solamente).
2. adv. m. Am. Mer., El Salv., Hond. y Méx. U. en oraciones exhortativas, generalmente pospuesto, para añadir énfasis a la expresión. Pase nomás. Atrévase nomás.
3. adv. m. Arg., Bol., Col., El Salv., Nic. y Ur. Apenas, precisamente.

updated ABR 23, 2009
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

'Nomás? is a single word, and is an adverb
To my mind "nomás" does not exist in the Spanish language. Does the Real Academia have a view, as far as anyone knows?

I heard it an awful lot in Nicaragua particularly, but I don´t think it´s correct.

updated ABR 23, 2009
posted by mdepps
0
votes

is that "está cercquita no más"?

"Nomás" is a single word, and is an adverb. And "cerquita" has only one C.

I saw the posts at WR, but none of them had exactly the nuance I was hoping for (see below).

Gus wrote:

esta a una cuadra'. it is a block away

esta alrededor de la esquina ...is around the corner

camine una cuadra y listo'. walk a block and thats it

!que va! solo esta alrededor de la esquina

Those all sound good, but do not mean the same as "just up the street/block." That English phrase is used in the following scenarios, for example.

-Excuse me, do you know where John Smith's house is?
-It's just up the street/block.

-How do I get to the grocery store.
-It's just up the street/block.

That is, it is not around the corner, or on the next block, but rather is on this same street block (located on the same section of street in between the two closest cross streets). The translation quoted by Quentin does not include this nuance, and could refer to something located several blocks away, whereas "just up the block" does not.

Thanks to both of you for replying.

updated ABR 23, 2009
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

is that "está cercquita no más"?

(further along): it's just ~ the road está un poco más allá or adelante:

http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php't=816005

updated ABR 23, 2009
posted by 0074b507
0
votes

esta a una cuadra.... it is a block away
esta alrededor de la esquina ...is around the corner

camine una cuadra y listo.... walk a block and thats it

!que va! solo esta alrededor de la esquina see second sentence

disclaimer... I could be wrong

updated ABR 23, 2009
posted by 00769608