'harto de extrañarte?

0
votes

Hi to everyone!
I've been digging on the song "No Hay Otra Manera" by Motterato but there is one lyric I'm having trouble with.

The first stanza goes:
Tú puedes reír
mientras yo lloro por ti
tú vas por ahí
mientras yo no me levanto harto de extrañarte tanto tanto

It's the "harto de extrañarte" that I can't seem to get translated. Is it idiomatic? If thats the case does anyone know what it "kinda" means in English?

¡Muchas Gracias todos!
Dan

4836 views
updated ABR 20, 2009
posted by dan8

9 Answers

0
votes

The song is sung without any hint of punctuation, but logically Samdie's take is the only possibility. It isn't unusual, in either English or Spanish, for lyrics to bend the rules of grammar a bit, so it's not surprising that there is no pause here. It probably just sounds better that way.

My translation:

You go off, while I don't get up (I stay in bed), tired of missing you so much, so much.

Although "sick of" is a possible translation, I like how "tired of" matches the image of the guy not getting out of bed. He just misses her so much that he can't even get up and face the world.

updated ABR 20, 2009
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

La banda se llama Moderatto. La palabra "harto" significa cansado o fastidiado.

Hi to everyone!

I've been digging on the song "No Hay Otra Manera" by Motterato but there is one lyric I'm having trouble with.

The first stanza goes:

Tú puedes reír

mientras yo lloro por ti

tú vas por ahí

mientras yo no me levanto harto de extrañarte tanto tanto

It's the "harto de extrañarte" that I can't seem to get translated. Is it idiomatic? If thats the case does anyone know what it "kinda" means in English?

¡Muchas Gracias todos!

Dan

updated ABR 20, 2009
posted by AntMexico
0
votes

My take on the last line was with the opposite meaning. "I can't get up / raise myself" (because) "I'm sick / tired / exhausted from missing you". Of course that interpretation requires a pause between "no me levanto" and "harto de extrañarte" for which I would expect to see a comma (but don't).

I agree with this translation.

La primera parte de la canción te da a entender que la persona está "sufriendo", por lo que el harto vendría a ser algo como "I'm sick of", o sea que ya está fastidiado y cansado de extrañarle tanto.

Ayy, cómo me cae mal Moderatto, pero cada quien sus gustos, jaja.

updated ABR 19, 2009
posted by Satlite
0
votes

That's the problem with lyrics websites. The lyrics are just transcribed by "some guy" (or "some gal" to be fair) and the problem is compounded by language when it is not known what level of Spanish proficiency the transcriber possessed when he/she transcribed the lyrics. The line breaks that were given in my original post were taken verbatim from musica.com. They do not provide any punctuation. However, I can personally attest to the "no" being present in "yo no me levanto" line after having listened closely to the song again.

Personally, I don't like translated poetry. While it is possible to mechanically translate literal word for word meaning it is impossible to extract the subtle, implied meaning, of the author. The same goes for music. You guys have been a great help in giving me a general idea about what the author meant. For this I am grateful and satisfied. If I cover the song I will sing it in the original Spanish for the same reasons as I gave above.

Many Thanks,

Dan

http://www.youtube.com/watch'v=SU6X8bnCW14

you must have read this one. Look at the spelling errors.

http://www.metrolyrics.com/no-hay-otra-manera-lyrics-moderatto.html

updated ABR 19, 2009
posted by 0074b507
0
votes

Hey, dan8, is the punctuation correct?

That's the problem with lyrics websites. The lyrics are just transcribed by "some guy" (or "some gal" to be fair) and the problem is compounded by language when it is not known what level of Spanish proficiency the transcriber possessed when he/she transcribed the lyrics. The line breaks that were given in my original post were taken verbatim from musica.com. They do not provide any punctuation. However, I can personally attest to the "no" being present in "yo no me levanto" line after having listened closely to the song again.

Personally, I don't like translated poetry. While it is possible to mechanically translate literal word for word meaning it is impossible to extract the subtle, implied meaning, of the author. The same goes for music. You guys have been a great help in giving me a general idea about what the author meant. For this I am grateful and satisfied. If I cover the song I will sing it in the original Spanish for the same reasons as I gave above.

Many Thanks,
Dan

updated ABR 18, 2009
posted by dan8
0
votes

Yeah that makes more sense. And samdie I agree with you. That's what I was gonna put... It seems that maybe we need some puctuation or something to make it easier to know what is going on in the song.

Hey, dan8, is the punctuation correct'

updated ABR 18, 2009
posted by Debiera
0
votes

mientras yo no me levanto harto de extrañarte tanto tanto

It's the "harto de extrañarte" that I can't seem to get translated. Is it idiomatic? If thats the case does anyone know what it "kinda" means in English?

¡Muchas Gracias todos!

Dan

You are looking at the "harto de extrañarte" part and trying to translate it in the translator, right? Well, it would be easier to look at the whole context "yo no me levanto harto de extrañarte." Instead of trying to put the whole phrase in just put the smallest parts possible. Like you would have to put "me levanto" together and the other verb with its pronoun together. "harto" should be put into the translator by itself so that you can know what it means.

But through this process I deduce that the sentence means "While I don't wake up fed up with missing you so much so much"

...just out of curiosity...Is the word "no" supposed in the lyrics?

Hi DPeters.
Levantarse is not to wake up but to rise, stand up or get out of bed. I would think that the line is missing a comma and would translate along the lines, "while I remain in bed, fed up with missing you so much so much.

updated ABR 18, 2009
posted by Eddy
0
votes

mientras yo no me levanto harto de extrañarte tanto tanto

It's the "harto de extrañarte" that I can't seem to get translated. Is it idiomatic? If thats the case does anyone know what it "kinda" means in English?

¡Muchas Gracias todos!

Dan

You are looking at the "harto de extrañarte" part and trying to translate it in the translator, right? Well, it would be easier to look at the whole context "yo no me levanto harto de extrañarte." Instead of trying to put the whole phrase in just put the smallest parts possible. Like you would have to put "me levanto" together and the other verb with its pronoun together. "harto" should be put into the translator by itself so that you can know what it means.

But through this process I deduce that the sentence means "While I don't wake up fed up with missing you so much so much"

...just out of curiosity...Is the word "no" supposed in the lyrics?
My take on the last line was with the opposite meaning. "I can't get up / raise myself" (because) "I'm sick / tired / exhausted from missing you". Of course that interpretation requires a pause between "no me levanto" and "harto de extrañarte" for which I would expect to see a comma (but don't).

updated ABR 18, 2009
posted by samdie
0
votes

mientras yo no me levanto harto de extrañarte tanto tanto

It's the "harto de extrañarte" that I can't seem to get translated. Is it idiomatic? If thats the case does anyone know what it "kinda" means in English?

¡Muchas Gracias todos!

Dan

You are looking at the "harto de extrañarte" part and trying to translate it in the translator, right? Well, it would be easier to look at the whole context "yo no me levanto harto de extrañarte." Instead of trying to put the whole phrase in just put the smallest parts possible. Like you would have to put "me levanto" together and the other verb with its pronoun together. "harto" should be put into the translator by itself so that you can know what it means.

But through this process I deduce that the sentence means "While I don't wake up fed up with missing you so much so much"

...just out of curiosity...Is the word "no" supposed in the lyrics'

updated ABR 18, 2009
posted by Debiera