"Candy," dulce or caramelo?

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Como se dice "Did you like the candy'" en Español

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updated ABR 3, 2009
posted by sidney2

6 Answers

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This is an interesting question.
I didn't know that "sweet" is used to refer "candy". I thought that it was just a taste, but it's used in England to refer "candy".

Good to know. smile

Marco

updated ABR 3, 2009
posted by Marco-T
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I see, thanks. Maybe a similar, general word in English would be "treats."

updated ABR 3, 2009
posted by 00bacfba
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Lazarus, I think I have heard golosina used for other children's snacks, such as salty things. Is that right?

Now that you mention it, it is often used to refer to the stuff sold in kiosks that sell all kind of children snacks, among which there are lots of sweet ones as well as salty ones. However, although you can maybe use the word to refer to the whole lot (like what we use to fill piñatas), I wouldn't call a pack of salty roasted seeds a "golosina".

updated ABR 3, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
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Lazarus, I think I have heard golosina used for other children's snacks, such as salty things. Is that right'

updated ABR 2, 2009
posted by 00bacfba
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Like in English, where candy is used in the USA, and sweet in England, terminology varies from country to country, as James said. In Spain, caramelo is normally a one bite candy, generally hard, as originally it was hardened melted sugar. "Dulces" is more general, and encompasses many types of sweet things (I'm not copying James, I swear), including even cakes and jellies. Golosina -less used- is, in theory, anything sweet, but it is used mostly for cheap(er) candies for children. Chocolate is almost anything chocolate based, regardless of its size, and bombón is a small piece of chocolate that often contains some fillings. I wouldn't be surprised if these uses are quite different in other countries.

updated ABR 2, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
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There is no single right answer, since the terms vary geographically. In some places a caramelo is a hard candy, while it others it is a soft candy. Dulces refers to all things sweet, not just candy, but can be used for candy in some cases. Golosina is another word that means sweets or candy. And chocolate candy is called chocolate in Spanish (as is hot chocolate in at least Mexico).

So, it depends.

updated ABR 2, 2009
posted by 00bacfba