HomeQ&Ael orden de las palabras

el orden de las palabras

0
votes

Que es el orden de las palabras que tienen ajectivos se describirlas?
Por ejemplo " blind seeing eye dog" . Como se dice en espanol? Este aqui " un perro de ciego vidente"? O perro ciego vidente? Que es necesario por fraso'

3615 views
updated ABR 1, 2009
posted by kourtney2

6 Answers

0
votes

I was translating "qué es el orden de las palabras" to "what is the order of words" which I know that is not right after you mentioned it. smile

Well... it is the right translation, in a way. The problem is that in English this distinction is normally not made, because one interpretation of the question is rather twisted and unusual:

What is your name? Lazarus (normal interpretation)
What is your name? My name is what appears in my passport to designate me ("robot" interpretation)

Obviously, very few would understand the question above as a definition of the term "your name", but being literal, you are codifying the words correctly. After all, you can ask:

What is your highness?

if you don't know what "your highness" means, and you expect a definition. Spanish uses "cuál" for the first type of question, and "qué" for definitions.

updated ABR 1, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

I was expecting you to mention this usage which I have seen before and provide some comment about its origin.

perro lazarillo

I think (I'm not 100% sure) that "perro guía" is more used in Mexico, but "perro lazarillo" is definitely a common term for it. The term "lazarillo" comes from the famous novel "El lazarillo de Tormes", where a boy called Lázaro, serves as a guide for his blind master.

updated ABR 1, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

..., so we simply say "perro guía (para ciegos)", as Daniel said.

I was expecting you to mention this usage which I have seen before and provide some comment about its origin.

perro lazarillo
http://www.google.com/search'hl=en&q=perro+lazarillo&aq=f&oq;=

updated ABR 1, 2009
posted by 0074b507
0
votes

Careful:

¿Qué es el orden de las palabras? = Can you define the term "the order of the words"?

¿Cuál es el orden de las palabras? = What is the order of the words?

Thanks, Lazarus for mentioning this. I think it's very easy for English speakers to misunderstand or misuse "qué" and "cuál".

I was translating "qué es el orden de las palabras" to "what is the order of words" which I know that is not right after you mentioned it. smile

Marco

updated ABR 1, 2009
posted by Marco-T
0
votes

Careful:

¿Qué es el orden de las palabras? = Can you define the term "the order of the words"?
¿Cuál es el orden de las palabras? = What is the order of the words?

The order is not as strict as in English, where there is a clear hierarchy in the order of the adjectives, but we normally avoid using too many concatenated adjectives, and we express the same thing with subordinates. "Un perror ciego vidente" would be a blind dog that can see (!!!), and "un perro de ciego vidente" could be interpreted either as the dog of a blind person who can see (!!!), or a seeing dog of a blind person, so we simply say "perro guía (para ciegos)", as Daniel said.

updated ABR 1, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

Hello Kourtney2:

I do not think you want a "blind seeing-eye dog"

I think the Spanish for "seeing-eye dog" is "perro guía" (guide dog)

This does not answer your question about placement or agreement of adjectives. You can check the Reference Section on this site for good information -- better than I am capable of discussing.

updated ABR 1, 2009
posted by Daniel
SpanishDict is the world's most popular Spanish-English dictionary, translation, and learning website.
© Curiosity Media Inc.