acordado

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Could someone translate this for me please

Que ilusion que te hayas acordado

Cheers

2616 views
updated FEB 25, 2009
posted by richard3

13 Answers

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Thank you Lazarus: Recently this is how I have been considering these verbs -- since so many of them have completely different meanings than their non-reflexive counter-part.

It was great to actually see this stated by someone.

Marco, "acordar" means "to agree"; "acordarse" (the verb used here) means "to remember". This is why I don't want to call these verbs reflexive: they are not verbs with "oneself" added to them, but verbs with a completely different meaning.

updated FEB 25, 2009
posted by Daniel
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The te is the reflexive pronoun here: que te hayas acordado. That's how you know it means "have remembered," not "have agreed."

Marco T said:

Now I got another question after I read your reply.

How do I recognize if it is "acordar" or "acordarse" when I see the conjugated or gerund tenses?

I think these two words are the same when they are conjugated. It is not easy for the beginners to think about the definition.

Thank you, lazarus.

Marco

>

updated FEB 25, 2009
posted by Natasha
0
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Richard said:

Cheers everyone, 'how nice/wonderful you remembered' does make sense, i think i was thrown a bit by the word 'ilusion'
In this context, 'ilusión' has the sense of "something that I might have imagined / hoped for / dreamed of" as opposed to the common meaning in English of something false that I might have believed.

updated FEB 24, 2009
posted by samdie
0
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lazarus1907 said:

Correct sentence:

¡Qué ilusión (me hace) que te hayas acordado!

Marco T said:

It means "what illusion you might have agreed'". Please correct me if I am wrong.

Marco, "acordar" means "to agree"; "acordarse" (the verb used here) means "to remember". This is why I don't want to call these verbs reflexive: they are not verbs with "oneself" added to them, but verbs with a completely different meaning.

Gus said:

se hayan puesto de acuerdo...... agree on something meeting of the minds

Now I got another question after I read your reply.
How do I recognize if it is "acordar" or "acordarse" when I see the conjugated or gerund tenses?
I think these two words are the same when they are conjugated. It is not easy for the beginners to think about the definition.

Thank you, lazarus.

Marco

updated FEB 24, 2009
posted by Marco-T
0
votes

lazarus1907 said:

Marco T said:

It means "what illusion you might have agreed'". Please correct me if I am wrong.

Marco, "acordar" means "to agree"; "acordarse" (the verb used here) means "to remember". This is why I don't want to call these verbs reflexive: they are not verbs with "oneself" added to them, but verbs with a completely different meaning.

Gus said:

se hayan puesto de acuerdo...... agree on something meeting of the minds

Cheers everyone, 'how nice/wonderful you remembered' does make sense, i think i was thrown a bit by the word 'ilusion'

Richard

updated FEB 24, 2009
posted by richard3
0
votes

Correct sentence:

¡Qué ilusión (me hace) que te hayas acordado!

The bracket is normally omitted, but it helps understanding the construction better.

Marco T said:

It means "what illusion you might have agreed'". Please correct me if I am wrong.

Marco, "acordar" means "to agree"; "acordarse" (the verb used here) means "to remember". This is why I don't want to call these verbs reflexive: they are not verbs with "oneself" added to them, but verbs with a completely different meaning.

Gus said:

se hayan puesto de acuerdo...... agree on something meeting of the minds

>

updated FEB 24, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

se hallan puesto de acuerdo...... agree on something
meeting of the minds

updated FEB 24, 2009
posted by 00769608
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I think that 'cause of the contex it was meant recordado - no not tricked

Richard said:

cheers, i saw that acordado could mean 'agree' also but the context was more like that the person had been tricked, can hayas acordado mean that'Richard

>

updated FEB 24, 2009
posted by 00769608
0
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I like Gus's version better: How nice that you remembered.

updated FEB 24, 2009
posted by 00bacfba
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Marco T said:

I think the phrase should be "¿Qué ilusión que te hayas acordado'"

It means "what illusion you might have agreed'".

Please correct me if I am wrong.

cheers, i saw that acordado could mean 'agree' also but the context was more like that the person had been tricked, can hayas acordado mean that?

Richard

Thank you,

Marco

>

updated FEB 24, 2009
posted by richard3
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The first que should be qué. That means "Isn't it wonderful that you have remembered'"

updated FEB 24, 2009
posted by 00bacfba
0
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Is the word ilusion used correctly here?
I would use emocion instead of ilusion

hoow nice you remembered

It reads that, that it felt good (to her or him) that something or other was remembered.

no idsclaimer need is need it here. I nailed it.

updated FEB 24, 2009
posted by 00769608
0
votes

I think the phrase should be "¿Qué ilusión que te hayas acordado'"

It means "what illusion you might have agreed'".

Please correct me if I am wrong.

Thank you,

Marco

updated FEB 24, 2009
posted by Marco-T