How do I say "English speaker"?

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And I was also wondering how common "hispanohablante" is. Someone told me that it wasn't used very much.

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updated FEB 26, 2009
posted by lhm27

8 Answers

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Hola, English spkear se dice angloparlante o anglohablante. Por otro lado, sí es usual ·hispanohablante para Spanish speaker y también existe el sinónimo hispanoparlante, aunque he oído más el primero. Todos estos términos se encuentran en el diccionario.de la RAE.

updated FEB 26, 2009
posted by AntMexico
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Well Ihm27, here's a Canadian perspective.

First, I googled the word "spanophone" and got several "hits". The best of those hits comes from Wikepedia and more or less looks like this:

"A Spanophone or Hispanophone is someone that speaks the Spanish language either natively or by adoption.
As an adjective, the word means "Spanish-speaking." The word originates with the name of the Roman province,
Hispania. "

You may already be aware that Canada has 2 official languages. They are english and french. It is common within Canada to refer to its people as either "anglophones" or "francophones". Those who are neither are sometimes referred to as "allophones". Knowing this, I did my google search for the word "spanophone" on the assumption that it would exist and be universally understood and accepted. I got lots of "hits" on "spanophones". As you can see from the Wikipedia extract, "hispanophone" is used to refer to spanish speakers on the west side of the Atlantic.

I'm not satisfied that I found vigor in the universal acceptance of the word. I suggest you google it yourself to see what felling you come away with. So, while I am completely at ease with the use of "anglophone" to describe an english speaker, in Canada, I would also be at ease (at least here at home) using the words "spanophone" or "hispanohone" as adjectives for spanish speakers.

As a Canadian, I would have absolutely no reservation or hesitation writing or speaking the words "spanophone" or "hispanophone". As I said, the words "francophone" and "anglophone" have gained all but daily use here. The words have no negative, derogatory or repugnant connotation of any kind whatsoever.

As I said earlier, I did end up with some reservation about the universality of the words but that would be the only thing that might cause me to pause about using them in foreign (foreign to a Canadian) or international setting.

I don't know if this is clarifying for you or obfuscating. Whatever your feeling, good luck with your decision.

Bueno suerte, Ihm.

updated FEB 26, 2009
posted by Moe
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pisacaballo said:

"Hispano[ha]blante" It is not necessary spanish. Hispania = Ispania --> "Península Ibérica" where spain and portugal are situated and where several languages are spoken not only spanish and portuguese.

Sí, pero la palabra se usa normalmente para significar "Spanish speaker," como ha dicho LadyDi.

updated FEB 26, 2009
posted by 00bacfba
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It is true "hispanoblante" sounds weird to my ears, just say "hablo español" o " hablo castellano".

updated FEB 26, 2009
posted by pisacaballo
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"Hispanoblante" It is not necessary spanish. Hispania = Ispania --> "Península Ibérica" where spain and portugal are situated and where several languages are spoken not only spanish and portuguese.

updated FEB 26, 2009
posted by pisacaballo
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Did you want to know how to say "English speaker" in Spanish? Those were the first two options I gave you. As far as "Spanish speaker," I think "hispanohablante" is pretty standard. "(Gente) de habla hispana" is another way of saying it.

updated FEB 26, 2009
posted by LadyDi
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LadyDi said:

How about "angloparlante" or "anglohablante"? "Hispanohablante" sounds good to me for "Spanish speaker".

I meant for Spanish. Woops.

Thanks though!

updated FEB 26, 2009
posted by lhm27
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How about "angloparlante" or "anglohablante"? "Hispanohablante" sounds good to me for "Spanish speaker".

updated FEB 26, 2009
posted by LadyDi